SKULK ARC Review: Read it if…..

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Pleasant afternoon to you, thrill seekers! Today’s Read-it-if is just a little bit special – it’s my first ever ARC (that’s Advance Reading Copy for the uninitiated…but of course, you already knew that…) review.  Many thanks to  Strange Chemistry for the opportunity to get my paws on this one pre-release!

Skulk is a new urban fantasy tale by Rosie Best, to be released on the 1st of October in e-version, and print version in the US and Canada, and on the 3rd of October for the UK and the rest of us Outlanders.

In Skulk we are introduced to Meg Banks, an ordinary lass who suddenly becomes extraordinary during a standard, run-of-the-mill, after-hours excursion to deface her school grounds with social-commentary-oriented graffiti.  Meg is interrupted during this mission by the entrance of an injured fox, who promptly morphs into a human male before dying in front of her.  Later, Meg discovers that she has somehow inherited the ability to shape-shift into fox form and at this point, things begin to go seriously pear-shaped for all concerned. But mostly for Meg.

Cue a crazy, sadistic sorceress, a merciless army of pigeons, a menagerie of urban shape-shifters and a creeping, flesh-eating fog!

skulk

Read it if:

* you have long harboured a sneaking suspicion that the particularly hirsute gentleman who sits opposite you on your daily commute may actually be a gorilla in human form

* you have a strong aversion to foggy weather – both for its natural potential to reduce visibility for motorists, and its supernatural potential to explode the heads of the unwary

* you are attracted to pretty, glittering objects….like egg-sized gemstones that have the power to alter your perception and/or assist in your plans for world domination

* you believe the words “pigeon” and “sky-vermin” are roughly interchangeable

Skulk is the perfect choice for your entry-level explorer of urban fantasy.  It has a nice spread of fantasy elements and the history behind the fantasy is explained in enough detail to keep the reader immersed in the story, but without so much complexity that one requires a wall-mounted genealogical tapestry to follow how the situation came to be.  In case you’re wondering about appropriate reader age, I would definitely keep this one in the “older teens” section, due to graphic violence, mentions of drug use and parental abuse.  Having said that though, Skulk is also a great option for adult readers who want a slightly lighter read in the style of Ben Aaronovitch or Mike Shevdon.

Can I also mention how much I love the cover art? How good is it? Well done to all concerned for proving it is possible to have a young adult novel featuring a teen female lead character, without resorting to the tired and over-used “long-haired girl with vacant expression” option for the cover.  Plus, that fox symbol would look fantastic on a t-shirt!

If I’ve whetted your appetite for all things foxy, stay tuned, because Rosie Best will be guest posting here at the shelf on Monday – that’s September 2nd for the calendar buffs among you.  And you can check out my Goodreads review here!

Until next time,

Bruce
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Fiction in 50 August Challenge: Famous Last Words…

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Fi50 number three is on, and the prompt this month is *cue slow, deep, booming voice*: FAMOUS….LAST….WORDS…..

fiction in 50

 

To join in, all you have to do is compose a piece of fiction in 50 words of less in the next week and post a link in the comments so others can drop by and compliment your fantastic wordsmithery!  For more detailed instructions and prompts for coming months, click on the attractive button above or the link on my header.

My contribution this month is titled:

Told You So

Christmas Eve:  Westfield carpark.  Air-con busted, sweat dripping, radio tinkling….

*…Snow is fallin’, all around me…*

The boyfriend guns toward a free space…

*…’tis the season…love and understanding…*

“You won’t make that, they’ve parked right on the line.”

“Nah, there’s plenty of room.”

Screeeeeeeeeeaaaaaaaak. Scraaaaaaaaaaapppeee.

*…Merry Christmas, everyone….*

Obviously, being a southern hemisphere blog, I tend towards uniquely southern hemispherical experiences…such as ridiculous snow-themed Christmas songs providing the backdrop for heat-stroke induced parking-lot rage.  And to really up the ante, here’s the video for the song featured in my Fi50:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZeyHl1tQeaQ

YOUR TURN!

Bruce

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Reminders and Teasers: A Smorgasboard of Bookish *Stuff*…

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Good afternoon shelf-buddies!  I bring to you today a veritable picnic basket overflowing with tempting and exciting reading-related delicacies! Hopefully by the end of this post you will find yourself filled to elegant sufficiency, slightly drowsy from the richness of your bookish repast and with any luck, not covered with crumbs or being stalked by the inevitable trail of ravenous ants.

First up, REMINDERS:

kid-lit-blog-hop-button-sep-2012-e1349976901756

Kid Lit Blog Hop #22

In case you missed my last post (and related fancy hat), I am currently tickled pink to be co-hosting the Kid Lit Blog Hop, home of all things child and literacy related. Click the button to join in the fun!

Fiction in 50 Challenge: August

fiction in 50It’s on again! For those who love to write but can never get past the first few sentences of your epic novel, this is the challenge for you! Create a piece of fiction in 50 words or less, and post it on your page in the last week of August.

This month’s prompt is: FAMOUS LAST WORDS

Click on the button for more info, and for upcoming prompts!

Second up, a TEASER!

I’m a little ashamed to admit that we shelf-dwellers have all been having a little trouble with skulkreigning in overblown egos in the last week or two.  The reason behind our sudden inflatedness of head is that we were recently approved to review our first ever ARC – for SKULK, by Rosie Best and published by Strange Chemistry!

Check out that cover – doesn’t it just suck you in? Skulk introduces us to Meg, an ordinary young lass who witnesses the death of a fox…who shapeshifts into a man.  Meg then discovers that she has inherited this power….and things go downhill for her from there!  Skulk is a great example of young adult urban fantasy, but I won’t say too much here because…..

…..In preparation for Skulk’s release on the 1st  (US/Canada/ebook) and the 3rd (UK) of September, I will be reviewing Skulk next week and then on the 2nd of September, the shelf will be honoured with a post from the author herself – Rosie Best!!

And finally, a bit of RETAIL THERAPY!

winterowls fox toy

In order that you are fully prepared when you rush out and order your copy of Skulk, I also have a little bit of foxy goodness from my crafty mate WinterOwls.

This darling little fox friend is available at her etsy shop here:

http://www.etsy.com/au/listing/155720293/handmade-fox-toy-fox-plush-upcycled-fox

It would make a great cuddle buddy to accompany the scarier bits of Skulk!

So there you have it – plenty to ponder over a lazy weekend.

Until next time,

Bruce

 

 

 

 

Kid Lit Blog Hop #22: Join in if…..

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klbh pimpin shotEveryone get your glad rags on because it’s time once again for the Kid Lit Blog Hop!

As you can see, I’m a bit excited because I have donned my special, first-time-ever, KLBH Co-Hosting Hat! For those of you who have never participated before, the KLBH provides a platform for any blogger who has ever had anything to say about children’s books (or literacy, or literacy-related activities) to hitch their post to the hop, so others can share in their wisdom (or wit, or wonder, or wordiness).  In the same vein, the hop is a great place to visit if you have any interest in children’s books (or literacy, or literacy-related activities, or wit or wonder or wordiness!).

SO JOIN IN IF:

you get a little thrill every time a new visitor pops by your blog

– you can’t go past a good linky party without considering how you can bend at least one of your posts to fit the rules

– you want to be part of a cheerful, all-species-inclusive, community of bloggers with an interest in kid lit!

Now that I’ve convinced you, you can read more about the hop and its guidelines below, and right at the end of the post is the linky so you can toss your own funky, fashionable, kid-lit-related hat in the ring!

See you round the hop!

Bruce (KLBH Co-Host. With hat to prove it.)

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Welcome to the 22nd Kid Lit Blog Hop. The Kid Lit Blog Hop takes place on the 1st and 3rd Wednesdays of each month. We have managed to create a dynamic and engaged community of children’s books bloggers, authors, publishers, and publicists, as well as parents seeking out their next great read. So, you are more than welcome to link in and take some time to make some new friends.

Please join me in welcoming back our co-hosts for this Hop, Bruce from The Bookshelf Gargoyle, Victoria Simcox – author of The Magic Warble and The Black Shard, Stacie from BeachBoundBooks. A big, big welcome to all of you! Please be sure to give each of our hosts a visit to say a quick hello and we’ll be sure to visit you right back!

Happy Hopping everyone and enjoy the Hop!

Kid Lit Blog Hop
<div align="center"><a href="http://motherdaughterbookreviews.com/category/kid-lit-blog-hops/" title="Kid Lit Blog Hop"><img src="http://motherdaughterbookreviews.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/09/Kid-Lit-Blog-Hop-Button-Sep-2012-e1349976901756.jpg" alt="Kid Lit Blog Hop" style="border:none;" /></a></div>

Kid Lit Blog Hop Rules *Please Read*

1. We ask that you kindly follow your hostesses and co-hosts. You can follow us any way you choose (Email, GFC, Twitter, Facebook, G+, Pinterest, etc.), but we’ve added our preferences below. If you could just give us a quick “follow” or “like” that would be much appreciated! Make sure to leave us a message if you are following us (i.e., on Twitter or Facebook or on our websites) and we will be sure to follow you back. Thanks! 🙂

Hostesses:

Renee @ Mother Daughter Book Reviews Twitter * Facebook

Jaymie @ Snacks for Max Twitter * Facebook

Sue @ Kid Lit Reviews Twitter * Facebook

Katie @ Youth Literature Reviews Twitter * Facebook

Julie Grasso, Author/Blogger Twitter * Facebook

Cheryl Carpinello, Author / Blogger Twitter * Facebook

Co-Hosts:

Bruce @ The Bookshelf Gargoyle Goodreads * Facebook

Victoria Simcox, Author Twitter * Facebook

Stacie @ BeachBoundBooks Twitter * Facebook

2. Link up any Kid Lit related post. This can be a link to a children’s book review, a discussion about children’s literature/literacy, or a post on a recently-read children’s book or one that you love from your childhood.

* Don’t link directly to your blog, it must be a specific post*

* For Authors, we prefer you to link to your blog if you have one *

* Make sure you include an image relevant to the POST (e.g., book cover), not your blog button or photo of yourself.*

* Feel free to link more than one post.*

3. Please visit AT LEAST the TWO LINKS directly ahead of your own and leave them some love in the form of a comment. We are trying to build a community of bloggers, readers, parents, authors, and others who are as passionate about children’s literature as we are so please CONNECT and follow any or all of the blogs that interest you!

4. If you like, grab the button above and put it somewhere on your blog, preferably the post you’re linking up. If you’d prefer, you can just add a text link back to this Hop so that others can find it and check out all these great book links!

5. It would really help us get the word out about the Kid Lit Blog Hop if you would be so kind as to tweet, share, and spread the word about the Hop!

Interested in co-hosting the Kid Lit Blog Hop? Please email renee @ motherdaughterbookreviews (dot) com and put Co-Hosting Blog Hop in the subject line.

Happy Hopping!

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Bad Poetry Contest: Am I too late to enter?????

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Bad Poetry Day

Good evening lovelies!  I have just this second found out about a bad poetry contest being hosted over at Oz the Terrier’s blog and at Haiku by Ku, having been alerted by a post from the lovely (and fluffy!) Misaki! Unfortunately I have only just found out about this, and I think the contest closes tonight, so time prevents me from doing a really terrible effort….but on the other hand, perhaps the short timeframe will provide the perfect gestational conditions for the creation of something truly awful.  I have decided, in keeping with my love of written pieces for those with tiny attention spans, to create for this contest a mini-Ode. Or Odette, if you like.

I have titled my entry:

Ode to a Yodel

Yodel-ay-hee-hooooooooo – ray!

I’ve added in the linky at the end of this post so you can hop around and appreciate (and vote for!) the brilliance and the badness in the other entries…enjoy!

And just for weirdness’ sake, as this is primarily a book blog, here’s the weirdest yodelling-related book I could find on such short notice. I think you’ll agree it’s a cracker:

the-yodel-of-cthulhu

Adios amigos!

Mad Martha

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What’s In A Name Challenge: Absent in the Spring…

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So here we are again, Obstacle Number (insert accurate number here) in the What’s in a Name Reading Challenge: Absent in the Spring by Mary Westmacott (aka Agatha Christie)…

Taken from: the Christie Listie (as a late and rather sneaky replacement)

Category: Six – a book with lost or found (or it’s equivalent) in the title

So it turns out Agatha Christie, cheeky little dame that she is, penned some romance novels under the name Mary Westmacott, and thought we wouldn’t notice.  Well, I didn’t actually, until it was pointed out to me.  But I’m glad I found out because it gave me a bit of scope to widen out the Christie Listie for this challenge.

Absent in the Spring centres on Joan Scudamore, an upstanding citizen and all-round walking moral compass, who finds herself waylaid by a flooded track on her train journey home from looking after her sick grown-up daughter.  During this period of unwanted exile, she reflects on her relationships so far and discovers some not altogether pleasant home truths about herself and the way others see her.  But how will she use this newfound knowledge?  One never knows when Ms Christie is at the pen….

absent in the springThis Book’s Point of Difference:

I must say, I’m not really one to go in for romance novels.  Luckily for me, this novel has absolutely no romance in it at all.  It’s more of a psychological portrait of the main character and in that regard is gripping in a not too demanding way.

Pros:

– I was surprised at how engaging this book actually was.  Despite the fact that most of the book is essentially a one-woman show, the strength of old Joan as a character and her willful denial of the painfully obvious really drives the book along.  Having said that, it’s also the type of book that you can pick up and put down and is light enough to be a great choice for a beach read…although given my aversion to, and lack of experience with, beaches, perhaps you’ll have to make that call yourself

– The style and voice are typical Christie.  By the end of the first page I was comfortable in the knowledge that I was with an old friend and master storyteller

– The ending has a twist.  I wasn’t expecting one, given that this isn’t a mystery story, but there is one nonetheless and I think it really adds to the post-reading, thought-inducing factor of the book

Cons:

– The style and voice are typically Christie. So you may spend the first few chapters (or indeed the whole book, depending on the level of your fandom) expecting someone to be discovered having been horribly murdered.

– There are no Belgians in this one, detective-like or otherwise

Overall, I was pleasantly surprised by how much I enjoyed this book.  I will definitely make it a point to read more of “Westmacott’s” back catalogue at some point.

Until next time,

Bruce

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Litera-tees: Tees for Readers (#3)…

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Afternoon all – I present you with a lazy, consumerist post for a lazy Tuesday afternoon….here are some more tees for the literary-minded, plus some very convenient information on who designed them and where you can spend your hard-earned cash purchasing them. You’re welcome, shoppers!

First up, some Harry-related loveliness:

master-of-death

—we have Master of Death by Catch A Brick, available at RedBubble….

Just-As-Sane-As-I-Am

…and Just As Sane As I Am by the unnecessarily talented Megan Lara, also available at RedBubble…and if you like Megan Lara’s nouveau art, she has produced a whole range of tees in this style with various characters – Hermione and many of the recent Doctor Who companions to name a few.

For the Tolkien fans, apparently it is possible to simply walk into Mordor, if this tee is anything to go by:

simply-walk1

It’s titled Simply Walk, is designed by Tom Kurzanski and is available at RedBubble

For those who like to express their opinions on the classics:

moby dicky…we have Moby Dicky by Budi Satria Kwan available at threadless

For those who like a bit of film with their bookery:

read-a-book

…here’s Vader Read A Book available at WeLoveFine shop…

movies-ruining-the-book1

…and Movies: Ruining the Book since 1920 by Jayson Dougherty, available at threadless

And finally, just because I love it and want someone to buy it for me (Att: Santa Claws!):

grim-readers

It’s the Grim Readers’ Book Club by WinterArtwork, available at Shirt.Woot

Layby now for Christmas!

Until next time,

Bruce

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Double Haiku Review: Everlost and Everwild…

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It’s Mad Martha with you on this fine afternoon! It’s been a while since I’ve popped out a haiku review, but really, it’s high time Neal Shusterman gets another outing given how much we enjoy his work over here in Shelf-ville.  After feeling devastated a number of years ago on finding out after finishing book one in his Skinjacker series, Everlost, that my library did not have any of the others in the series, you can only imagine my joy on randomly happening across book two, Everwild, while browsing at Booktopia.

image

And guess how much it was?

No, go on, have a guess.

Nope, cheaper than that.

Get this: $1.75. With FREE shipping!!

Of course I had to immediately buy it – in fact, such was my excitement that I accidentally ordered two copies, so now I have one for the week and one for Sunday Best.  You can see from the picture that I’m clearly beside myself over this serendipitous occurence.

In the first book in the series, teenagers Nick and Allie, after dying in the same car accident, find themselves in a sort of limbo for children known to its residents as “Everlost”. Everlost is entirely populated by the souls of children under the age of 17(known as Afterlights) who seemingly got distracted on their way down the tunnel into the light of the the proper afterlife.  In an interesting quirk of Everlost, the events surrounding each Afterlight’s death often become a permanent feature of their current appearance – for example, Nick had the misfortune to die while munching on a chocolate bar, and as a result now bears an eternal facial smear of the stuff.  Afterlights may also find they have gained particular abilities that can be a help or a hinderance in their new existence.  Allie for instance, discovers that she has the talent of “skinjacking” – the ability to jump inside living people, or fleshies, and make them do her bidding.  The book mostly deals with Nick and Allie’s attempts to come to terms with their new afterlife, and along the way they meet a varied crew of monsters, bullies and (supposed!) saints who are all putting their own personal stamp on their little piece of pre-Paradise.

everlost

Stuck forever young

in adolescent limbo

How low can you go?

In Everwild, we rejoin Nick and Allie as they separately work against the machinations of Mary Hightower, the self-styled ruler and mother-duck of Everlost, who has far-reaching visions of making Everlost her own personal paradise through some very ethically-dubious methods indeed.  The significance of one’s own self-image is ever-present as Nick and Mikey McGill discover the double-edged sword of celebrity, Everlost-style.  Allie meanwhile uncovers the incredible secret behind her ability to skinjack.  Add to this a few new characters struggling to define their sense of what is right in an existence with no rules, and the increasingly self-righteous actions of Mary Hightower and you’ve got yourself an eventful read!

everwild2

You are what you eat,

steal, remember or create.

Pays to choose wisely.

One of the things we shelf-dwellers love most about Neal Shusterman is his amazing talent for world-building.  Both in this series and in the Unwind series (soon to be four books long – seriously, if you haven’t encountered it before, get on it. Quick!) Shusterman manages to create totally engaging alternate worlds without having to resort to lots of explanation or tiresome, forced situations in which characters “discover” important facts about the world for the sole benefit of the reader.  Similarly, he creates teenage characters that, despite often having an obvious foible or flaw, are fleshed out and driven by motivations that are believable, if not always reasonable.  In addition, Shusterman is positively Mary Poppins-esque in the way he manages to squeeze so much content into ordinary sized books – on finishing one of his books I always feel like I’ve just slogged through a tome the size of Macquarie Dictionary and am continually surprised to find that all has been revealed within a scant 450 pages or less.

I’m both chuffed and frustrated to discover that there is a third book in this series – Everfound – mainly because my library doesn’t have that one either, and I can’t imagine I’ll be lucky enough to randomly find it for $1.75 and free shipping…although, one can always hope.

Yours in happy haiku-ery,

Mad Martha

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Top Ten Tuesday: Speculative Sequels…

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toptentuesday

A fine afternoon to you all – as you can probably guess from the title of this post, it’s time for one of my random occasional jaunts into meme territory, namely the ever-popular Top Ten Tuesday hosted by the Broke and The Bookish! This week’s topic is…..

BOOKS THAT I WISH HAD A SEQUEL

While most of these books are for the very young (or young at heart), I believe that they could all have done with a nicely marketed follow-up title.  I have given my suggestions (and in some cases, possible synopsises synopsi plot descriptions), but please feel free to add your own if any better ideas spring to mind.

oh the places youll go1. Oh, The Places You’ll Go! by Dr Seuss

This seems to be a perennial favourite on my TTT lists…I would like to see a sequel to this one that honours the parents and caregivers who read this one over and over to their offspring, titled….

Oh, the Places I’LL Go Once You Kids Have Moved Out

mrs queen 2

2. Mrs Queen Takes the Train by William Kuhn

This was a great little read, but I would like to see a sequel that is in keeping with the aftermath of most of my journeys on public transport, titled….

Mrs Queen Takes Two Aspirin and Has A Good Lie Down

guernsey3. The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society by Mary-Ann Shaffer and Annie Barrows

This one, despite being a firm favourite of mine, is unlikely ever to get a sequel given that the author has since passed on, but I would like to see something to bring the story into the new millenium, titled….

The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society’s Organic Vegan Cookbook (for iPad)

goodnightmrtom4. Goodnight Mr Tom by Michelle Magorian

A childhood favourite that I discovered (and loved!) as a grown-up.  Once again, in deference to the experience of parents everywhere, I would love to see a range of increasingly short and frustrating sequels to this one titled….

Mr Tom, Can You Read Me A Story?

Mr Tom, Can I Have A Glass of Water?

Mr Tom, I Need to Go to the Toilet…

and finishing up with Mr Tom Needs A Good Stiff Drink

 

curious incident5. The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time by Mark Haddon

A bestseller if ever there was one, and I would love to see intrepid Christopher Boone turn his detective wiles to a sequel for the feline fanciers amongst us, titled….

The Puzzling Occurence of Cat Sick in My Slipper

phantomtollbooth

6. The Phantom Tollbooth by Norton Juster

I would love to see this classic of silliness and punnery followed up by something a bit more sensible and dour, titled….

The Ph-inancially Viable Tollbooth:  A No-Nonsense Guide to Beating Rising Travel Costs

wherethewildthingsare7. Where the Wild Things Are by Maurice Sendak

Once again, I’d love to see this children’s classic tackle some of the problems that more modern children (and their imaginary friends) may be facing, in a sequel titled….

Where the Wild Things Were: Children’s Excessive Screen Time and the Demise of the Mythical Creature

harold and the purple crayon

8. Harold and the Purple Crayon by Crockett Johnson

The oft-told tale of the small child and his creative spirit….I would be hoping for a sequel in a sort of “Where is he now?” type of vein, titled…

Harold and the Neutral Paintbrush.…being a memoir of a young graffiti offender’s participation in community beautification programs

whereisthegreensheep

9.  Where is the Green Sheep? by Mem Fox and Judy Horacek

For this fun and frolicky tale, I’d love to see the sequel that charts the farmer’s instant emotional reaction on discovering that s/he is missing a sheep, titled….

Who Left the Bloody Gate Open?

and finally,

neverending story10. The Neverending Story by Michael Ende

I don’t have a suggested title for this one, but if it doesn’t have a sequel it’s just a case of false advertising really.

So that’s my two bob’s worth – feel free to chime in with your own suggested titles – I’d love to hear from you!

Oh look, here’s a large enticing button…

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Until next time, my friends!

Bruce

Two Quirky Picture Books: Read-it-aloud-if….

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Hey there reading buddies! Today I’ve got two picture books for you:  Shark Vs. Train by Chris Barton and Tom Lichtenheld, and The Pet Project: Cute and Cuddly Vicious Verses by Lisa Wheeler and Zachariah Ohora.

shark vs trainThe highly thought-provoking Shark vs Train follows a hypothetical battle betwixt toothy sea creature and iron-clad steam machine. The overarching message at the end of this one is that context is everything!

Read-it-aloud-if:

* you’ve ever idly debated the relative merits of two random objects across a range of wildly unlikely scenarios

* you are a philosophy buff with a particular interest in toy-related dilemmas

* you believe the transition of competition-style reality tv shows to book format is long overdue

* you are a boy, aged 3 to 93 +, or are responsible for providing reading material for a boy, aged 3 to 93+

I really enjoyed this book as it is super relatable for anyone who has ever spent time with children of a certain age.  What tickled me most though, was that I could just imagine the book being played out as a serious conversation between two little fleshlings…and realised that the two little fleshlings could be substituted for two old men and the imagined conversation was altered not one jot.  Now that’s proof of a wide appeal!

pet projectWe’re quite fond of a bit of poetry round the shelf, and The Pet Project, a story about a young girl researching an appropriate choice of pet, was therefore fondly received.

Read-it-aloud-if:

* you believe any major life decision should be approached using fieldwork, careful recording of observations, and an empirically verifiable method

*you firmly believe that your parents would have allowed you to keep those seven cats that followed you home, had you only been able to demonstrate the economic boon that would have resulted from the creation of a cottage industry in your bedroom based on woven cat-hair socks and scarves

* the idea of being wee-ed on by a guinea pig grosses you out….but the idea of someone else being wee-ed on by a guinea pig puts you in a smug kind of good humour

The illustrations in this book are really appealing and perfectly complement the humour in the verses.  This is definitely one to read to any kid who’s been bugging you to get them a pet.

In other news, did I mention the blog is now followable on Bloglovin’? No? Well it is. As demonstrated by this fancy button:

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I wonder what would happen if you clicked it…..

Until next time!

Bruce