Bruce’s Reading Round-Up: Great Yarns for Tweens…

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It’s time to round up some reads for the young ones featuring outrageous babysitters, spies-in-training and a whole world of magic right under our noses.  Saddle up, let’s get after ’em!

Marge in Charge (Isla Fisher)

*We received a copy of Marge in Charge from Allen & Unwin for review*

marge in charge

Marge in Charge by Isla Fisher Published by Allen & Unwin, 27th July 2016. RRP: $14.99

Two Sentence Synopsis: 

Jemima thinks that being looked after by a babysitter will be boring, but she reckoned without rainbow-haired firecracker Marge!  Now Jemima has to work hard to make sure Marge doesn’t turn the house upside down.

Muster up the motivation because…

…this is actually three stories, not one, featuring an old granny with more than a bit of life left in her yet.  In fact, the mini-fleshlings might find it hard to keep up with her spontaneity and sense of fun.  In these three introductory tales, Jemima and her little brother Jake are left in the care of diminutive Marge after their parents go out leaving strict instructions to follow the rules.  Marge, who is a blend of Mary Poppins, Nanny McPhee and Fran Drescher, manages to stick to the spirit of the rules, if not the letter, causing chaos and excitement, as well keeping a few tricks up her sleeve in order to save the day.  The first story is our introduction to Marge on a regular night in, the second features a right royal knees-up at a friend’s birthday party, while the third story demonstrates why school visitors need to sign in to the office before attending class.  These stories are perfectly pitched at the 6 to 9 year old age range, being short, action-packed and illustrated throughout.  As a serial read-aloud before bed, or a quick dose of comedy for confident young readers, Fisher has managed to hit the nail on the head with a lovable and quirky old Marge.

Brand it with:

While the cat’s away; age is just a number; serial offender

Archie Greene and the Alchemist’s Curse (D.D. Everest)

*We received a copy of this title from Allen & Unwin for review*

archie greene

Archie Greene and the Alchemist’s Curse by D. D. Everest. Published by Allen & Unwin, 27th July 2016. RRP: $14.99

Two Sentence Synopsis:  

Archie returns to his apprenticeship at the Museum of Magical Miscellany before unexpectedly receiving a second, unforeseen firemark. After discovering that his destiny may require an important choice, Archie and his friends must work together to unearth the secrets of the past, before history repeats itself.

Muster up the motivation because…

…this is a richly imagined tale set in a thoroughly detailed magical world.  Let’s just get out of the way straight of the bat that there are marked similarities between this story and the Harry Potter series which will be obvious to anyone who has read the latter.  This didn’t put me off particularly though, because Archie is a different sort of a boy to Harry and there are different social and historical aspects at play in Archie’s world.  Within the first few chapters Archie receives a completely unexpected (and quite possibly dangerous) new apprenticeship mark, as well as being told in a highly public (and quite possibly ruinous) fashion that his destiny is cloudy at best.  I had high hopes that I would get sucked into this story in the same way that I did with the Potter series, but this one fell short just a bit – possibly because it is the second in the series and I haven’t read the first.  The author takes great pains to point out the salient bits of information that readers new to the series might need to know, and while this is helpful, it does slow the story significantly in the early stages.  If you can get past the informational asides however, there is a detailed world awaiting you with plenty of spirit and flair, as well as a historical mystery that appears to be replaying itself in the present.  I would be interested to go back to book one and start this series where it is supposed to begin because the writing is quite absorbing, the characters varied and the world thoroughly magical.

Brand it with:

Alternative Potter; Workplace Health & Safety; Destined for Weirdness

The Double Cross: And Other Skills I Learned as a Superspy (Jackson Pearce)

*We received a copy of The Double Cross from Bloomsbury Australia for review*

double cross

The Double Cross by Jackson Pearce. Published by Bloomsbury Australia, August 2016. RRP: $14.99

Two Sentence Synopsis: 

Hale is the most unfit spy at spy school and it doesn’t help that his parents are legendary field agents.  When his parents go missing in action however, Hale must use all his skills to track them down – and avoid the other spies while he’s doing it.

Muster up the motivation because…

…apart from being  a lovely change from the magic/fantasy genre, this is a book that deftly mixes action and humour to create a highly absorbing adventure.  Hale is an immediately likable narrator and we are introduced to him as he uses his brains to outwit his fellow spy-students and avoid the most heinous of punishments: extra push-ups.  There’s a certain unaffected confidence in Hale, despite his obvious physical failings in the fitness department, and when coupled with his sister Kennedy’s boundless energy and advanced spy-sills, the pair ensure that the story moves on apace.  There are layers of mystery to solve here and because everyone involved is a spy or spy-in-training, it’s not immediately apparent who the good guys are.  I’d definitely recommend this to young readers who love action that is blended with characters that don’t take themselves too seriously, in a setting that doesn’t need magic or fantasy to make it seem unreal.

Brand it with:

Saving the parents; constant vigilance; agents in disguise

That’s all I’ve got for you today, so let’s split up and meet back here once you’ve tamed one of these wild reads!

Until next time,

Bruce

 

wild beasts

 

 

 

 

 

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