Bruce’s Reading Round-Up: The “New Release Picture Book” Edition…

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Following on from yesterday’s theme of visual stunnery, today I have four new release picture books for you.  I must warn you, one of them features guinea pigs dressed up as Victorian-era orphan boys.  On that note, let’s saddle up and get into it.

Oi Dog! (Kes Gray & Jim Field)

*We received a copy of Oi Dog! from Hachette Australia for review*

Two Sentence Synopsis:  oi-dog

In this thrilling sequel to Oi Frog!, Frog decides to change things up a bit.  But what on earth will the animals sit on now?

Muster up the motivation because…

…if you loved the word-twisting, rhyme-busting, sit-a-thon that was Oi Frog!, you will definitely appreciate the humour (and the fairness of the new rules) presented in Oi Dog!  Without giving too much away, this is essentially the exact same story as the earlier book, with animals coerced into sitting on objects that rhyme with their name, capped off with a funny, off-beat twist at the end.  I had forgotten how funny the facial expressions of the various ill-seated animals are and that provided a good laugh throughout.  If you are planning to read this one aloud, make sure you have a good lung capacity (or a ventolin inhaler to hand), because some of those compound sentences will really give you a vocal workout.  The mini-fleshlings loved this book and since it has been a while since we borrowed Oi Frog! from the library, they didn’t particularly twig that the humour and style was the same as a book they had read before.  Apart from the poor animal that has to sit on smelly pants (can you guess which?), the funniest part of the book for the youngest mini-fleshling was to be found in the endpapers, wherein resides a tiny picture of the dog on the cover passing wind.  The book was asked for repeatedly just so the mini-fleshlings could point and laugh at said flatulent dog, so really, it could be said that every inch of this book has something to enjoy.

Brand it with:

Seating arrangements; animal stories; challenging the status quo

The Sisters Saint-Claire (Carlie Gibson & Tamsin Ainslie)

*We received a copy of The Sisters Saint-Claire from Allen & Unwin for review*

Two Sentence Synopsis:  

The Sisters Saint-Claire by Carlie Gibson & Tamsin Ainslie.  Published by Allen & Unwin, 28th September 2016.  RRP: $19.99

The Sisters Saint-Claire by Carlie Gibson & Tamsin Ainslie. Published by Allen & Unwin, 28th September 2016. RRP: $19.99

A family of mice love to go to market every week, but Cecile, the youngest, is just too small to go along.  She is also a dab-hand at making pies – could these be the key to the family’s fortune?

Muster up the motivation because…

…this delightful little tome is as cheery and uplifting as a successful trip to a boutique artisan makers market in the south of France.  It may surprise you to know then, that it was actually cooked up by an Aussie author.  Everything about this book screams charm and whimsy, from its sweet little protagonist family of mice, to the dreamy, old-fashioned illustrations.  The rhyme and rhythm of the text is absolutely spot-on, which will be a blessed relief to those reading aloud (although you may want to test-drive the few French words in your head first!) and the story feels just a touch longer than your average picture book, so this is a great pick for the 5 to 7 year olds.  The text is broken up with plenty of individual illustrations, and this, combined with the full page spreads, mean that there is plenty of imagery to examine for those who like to spot cheeky little details going on out of sight of the main illustrative action.  To top off the satisfying and cheerful ending, the author has included a recipe for Croque Monsieur, so that budding little foodies can whip something up with their grown-ups and extend the story further.  I’d recommend this to young readers who like gentle, colourful stories that demonstrate how little people can do big things.

Brand it with:

Le mice!; farmers markets; royal seal of approval

A Guinea Pig Oliver Twist (Tess Newall & Alex Goodwin with Charles Dickens)

*We received A Guinea Pig Oliver Twist from Bloomsbury Australia for review*

Two Sentence Synopsis:  guinea-pig-oliver-twist

It’s Oliver Twist with guinea pigs.  What’s not to like?

Muster up the motivation because…

…if you can’t find something to like in a book replete with cloth-capped and lace-bonneted rodents acting out scenes from one of the most-loved pieces of literature in the English-speaking world, then I truly weep for your loss.  Really, who can’t go past a bit of guinea-pig related silliness? Not I, that’s for sure.  As the first few pages and A5 format suggest, this is an abridged retelling of Dicken’s classic, Oliver Twist, featuring guinea pigs photographed in front of teeny replicas of Victorian streets.  The book begins with a very handy image of the cast of characters, helpful if you want to keep your Fagins and your Dodgers straight, and I couldn’t help but have a giggle at the appropriately surly and common-looking guinea pig that had been selected to play the scoundrel Bill Sikes.  I am quite surprised, in fact, by the lengths that the authors have gone to in selecting guinea pigs that embody the natures of the characters that they are representing.  Mr Bumble is chubby and just a bit unkempt, as one would expect, while Mr Brownlow (played ably by one “Molly”) has a regal sort of bearing.  The guinea pig version of Fagin even has black markings across his face, making him (her, actually) look appropriately sly and conniving.  The story is divided into sections, relaying Oliver’s travels to, and outside of, London, and there are no more than two paragraphs of text on any page, making it easy to get through quickly.  I will admit that I much preferred the end of the musical, in which Fagin and the Artful Dodger skip off into the sunset, singing jauntily, to the end that Fagin meets here, but I suspect it might be tricky to photograph guinea pigs in full dance mode, given that guinea pigs are not known for their high-kicking abilities.  If you are a fan of guinea pigs, or indeed Oliver Twist, this will be a quirky and cute addition to your collection.

Brand it with:

Rodents of Victorian London; classic literature (with rodents); bonding with your pets

The Pruwahaha Monster (Jean-Paul Mulders, Jacques Maes & Lise Braekers)

*We received a copy of this title from the publisher via Netgalley*

Two Sentence Synopsis:  pruwahaha-monster

A boy and his father go to play on the swings; the boy’s favourite activity.  Will he be safe when the Pruwahaha monster spots him through the trees?

Muster up the motivation because…

…this is an unusual tale that isn’t what it seems.  I wasn’t entirely sure what to make of the story once I’d finished reading it, but overall I think it hits just the right note of mystery and adventure.  The illustrations are gorgeously creepy and eerily simple, with a sense of movement that captures the atmosphere of the weather and the mood of slight danger that accompanies the boy as he swings.  The text is short and matter-of-fact, and as the monster creeps closer to the boy, it looks as if all will be lost in a quick snip-snap of monster jaws.  There is a twist at the end that will allow readers to make their own interpretations of how the story goes, which is a good thing to see in books for this age group as it requires young readers to construct their version of the story based on what they can pick up from the illustrations and the text.  All in all, I think this is one that will be asked for again and again, as readers will want to go back to the beginning and see if they can spot clues that they might have missed the first time around.

Brand it with:

childhood pastimes; fathers and sons; if you go down to the woods today

I refuse to believe that amongst these gems there is not at least one that you wish to hunt down and make your own.  Which of these beauties do you have your eye on?

Until next time,

Bruce

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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8 thoughts on “Bruce’s Reading Round-Up: The “New Release Picture Book” Edition…

  1. First the Guinea Pig Nativity – cute, and plenty of cloaks and headdresses. Then came the Guinea Pig Pride & Prejudice – excuse me, pass the bucket while I throw up. Guinea pigs are not toys, they do not need to be dressed up in bonnets and clothes. A Guinea Pig Oliver Twist – OMG, please, please stop abusing these animals!!! I blame it on the never-ending circuit of guinea pigs in costume on Facebook.

    Please stop.

    Just stop.

    Give Guinea Pigs back their dignity!! I also blame GForce – which I stopped watching at the point the girl was applying make-up to her new companion. NO NO and NO again.

    … rants echo off into the distance, followed by further sounds of retching….

    Like

    • It is indeed a strange old world, when a guinea pig could end up better dressed than some humans. I blame the dog people, with their fashions and such – keeping up with the Jones’s has now extended to keeping up with the Jones’s pets, obviously.

      Liked by 1 person

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