TBR Friday: The League of Beastly Dreadfuls…

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TBR Friday

It’s TBR Friday once again and I’m happy to say I’ve knocked over another reasonably substantial tome in the last fortnight in my progress toward Pike’s Peak in the Mount TBR Reading Challenge 2017.  The League of Beastly Dreadfuls by Holly Grant was another that I had marked down at the beginning of the year as one I particularly wanted to get through in this challenge, so it’s a relief to have finished it.

the league of beastly dreadfuls

Ten Second Synopsis:

Anastasia’s world is turned upside down when her parents are unexpectedly killed in a freak vacuum-cleaning accident and she is whisked away to live with her strange and not altogether friendly Great Aunts in a sprawling house that used to be St Agony’s Asylum for the Criminally Insane. Once there, Anastasia is plagued by the sense that something is not right – could it be the lunatic boy gardener, the proliferation of portraiture featuring monobrowed ladies, or simply the poor cooking that could be to blame?

Time on the TBR Shelf:

Since January, 2015.

Acquired:

From the Book Depository as a pre-order.

Reason I haven’t read it yet:

It is one of a cluster of middle grade books on my TBR that are of a similar theme and because I have multiple of these to choose from, I end up choosing none at all.  Hence the fact that they are all still on my TBR shelf.

Best Bits:

  • The book has a humorous, light-hearted tone, which makes it very easy to flick through.  I quite enjoyed the style of humour at the start of the story and even dog-eared a page that had the main character saying, “Curse you, Winkles!” after tripping over a garden gnome (named Winkles) because I thought that the phrase was one I could certainly slip into my everyday speech patterns.
  • The story is easy to follow and the mystery isn’t too complex, so this is a good choice for when you are looking for a fun read that won’t make you work too hard.
  • Without spoiling the plot at all, I really enjoyed the originality of certain talents displayed by certain young male characters that ally themselves with Anastasia.  It’s so rewarding to discover “magical” style talents and folk that aren’t common in other literature for this age group.

Less Impressive Bits:

  • After initially enjoying the banterish, tangent-seeking style of humour in the story, by about halfway through I felt that it slowed the pace a little.
  • The resolution to Anastasia’s problems seemed a bit too wacky and convenient to me and appeared to be setting up for the second book in the series rather than solely concluding this one.   Overall, I enjoyed the book, but I won’t be chasing up the second as the narrative style grated on me after a while and I wanted the plot to move a bit quicker.

On reflection, was this worth buying?

I have absolutely no idea why I decided I had to have this so badly that I put it on pre-order.  I would have been just as happy borrowing it from the library I suspect.

Where to now for this tome?

To be sold at Suitcase Rummage.

So that’s eleven books down out of my hoped-for total of twelve for the year, and since we’re only at early June, I could well extend my goal to the second level of Mt. Blanc (24 books).  I think I’ll leave it as is at the moment though and see how I go.  The second half of the year is always busy with new releases and my review schedule for the next few months looks pretty packed as it is.  Anyway, if you’d like to check out my progress toward any of my reading challenges for 2017, you can do that here.

Until next time,

Bruce

The Eye of the Reindeer: Snow, Sanity and the Search for Self…

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eye-of-the-reindeer

We readers know that it is super important to make sure you have the right book for the holiday season.  Something that won’t be over too quickly, that will take you on a journey (even if you have to stay at home) and will plunge you right into a new and unexpected world.  Today’s book does all of those things and more in an epic journey toward freedom of body and self, spanning more than 30 years.  We received The Eye of the Reindeer by Eva Weaver from Hachette Australia for review and here’s the blurb from Goodreads:

Shortly after her thirteenth birthday, Ritva is sent away to Seili, an island in the far north of Finland. A former leper colony, Seili is now home to ‘hopeless cases’ – to women the doctors call mad. But Ritva knows she doesn’t belong there. As biting winter follows biting winter, she longs to be near to her sister, and wonders why her father ever allowed her to be taken to this desolate place.

Hope arrives in the form of Martta, a headstrong girl who becomes Ritva’s only friend. Martta is a Sami, from the north. All through her childhood, Ritva’s mother told her wonderful Sami legends and tales – of Vaja the reindeer, the stolen sealskin, of a sacred drum hidden long ago. When Ritva and Martta decide to make their escape, this is where they will head.

So begins an odyssey over frozen sea and land towards a place where healing and forgiveness can grow. This is a story about friendship, about seeing the world through a different perspective, and the stories and tales that can make up a life.

Wowsers, what an epic!  I had absolutely no idea when I started reading this book that it would span such a long time period and feature an unbelievable journey, both in foot miles and in growth of characters.  Ritva is a young woman in 1913 when she is shipped off to Seili, an asylum set on an island in the freezing north, and home to women that have been deemed (correctly or incorrectly) difficult cases.  The daughter of a pastor, Ritva has long experienced strange dreams and visions, and it is only when she meets Martta, a young Sami woman imprisoned with her, that she discovers that her dreams may be related to legends of the Northern Sami people.  After a daring escape, Ritva and Martta are caught up in a journey toward physical freedom from Seili, and the emotional journey of dealing with family history, sexuality and who they really want to be.

The book is broken into a number of parts that correspond with certain legs of the journeys that the girls – and then later on, women – take.  The story begins with Ritva’s time on Seili and we are given certain glimpses into her past and the reasons why her father may have had her committed in the first place.  This family mystery continues throughout much of the book until it is brought to a shocking, yet satisfying conclusion about two-thirds of the way through.    After this, Ritva tries to carve out a place for herself to belong and untangle the pressures of expectation and desire that have weighed her down.

I haven’t read a book like this in quite a long time, if ever.  The Eye of the Reindeer is totally focused on Ritva as she faces incredible challenges throughout her life.  The pace is quite slow, despite the fact that the story begins in Ritva’s adolescence and ends after her middle age, and yet I found each section totally absorbing while I was reading it.  I think my favourite part of the book was Ritva and Martta’s escape from Seili, their unconventional modes of transport and the suspense of potential recapture set against such a hostile environment.  The setting in Scandinavia and the lands at the top of the world was so well described as to almost be a character in itself and I was fascinated by the details relating to the indigenous people of this region – the Sami – and their way of life.  The author leaves some notes after the story is finished about the Sami and their current predicament for those who wish to find out more.

This book certainly won’t be for everyone, given the depth in which it explores difficult subjects like abuse, abandonment and betrayal, and the slow unfolding of the narrative, and certainly isn’t one that, had I known in advance how hefty the story would feel, I would probably have ever picked up.  The atmosphere is quite tense in some parts and particularly gloomy in others, but for the most part there is an undercurrent of hope and determination that spurred me on to find out how Ritva’s story might end.  Overall though, I am so happy to have read Ritva’s story and was completely absorbed in her life as it unfolded.

If you have a space in your schedule in the next few months which could be filled with a vast, sprawling landscape and a young woman slowly picking her way towards truth over the course of an incredible life, then I would definitely recommend you have a go at The Eye of the Reindeer.

Plus, the author has a rhyming first and surname.

That’s always a bonus.

Until next time,

Bruce