Yarning with Mad Martha about…Graphic Novel “Light” (+ a free crochet pattern!)

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yarning with mad martha_Fotor (2)

I am beyond delighted to be with you today, to yarn about an uplifting, adventure-filled, delightful wordless graphic novel with a protagonist that you will just want to render in crochet.  Luckily for you, I have done just that and will share my pattern with you so you can do the same – bliss!

But I’m getting ahead of myself.

We received a copy of Light by Rob Cham from the publisher via Netgalley for review and here’s the blurb from Goodreads:

This wordless comic book follows the exploits of a backpack-toting adventurer in a quest to find a mysterious treasure. Framed in black, the illustrations offer delightful bursts of color and are sure to entertain readers of any age.

light

Wordless picture books, or wordless graphic novels, can be a tricky subgenre to connect with.  Sometimes the reading experience is profound or hugely memorable, while other times you can get to the end of the book and think, “What on earth was that about?!”  I am pleased to report that Light sits neatly in the former camp, slowly revealing a story of altered goals and shifting perspectives told through a cast of silent, yet original and quirky characters.

The protagonist is the small white hominid on the cover, who we meet as he (she?) is preparing for some sort of quest.  It’s not immediately clear what the quest is about or why our friend is embarking upon it, but the early stages of it seem fraught with danger and risk.  Armed with only a backpack, map and ineffective-looking sword, our hero sets off through a craggy, inhospitable landscape.  As the story continues, and our friend meets a startling array of creatures, from huge dragon-like beasts, to formless giants to a particularly spindly guru (of sorts), he (she?) makes a friend, and more than a few enemies.

And of course, it’s one thing to make it safely to your goal, but quite another – as any Hobbit will tell you – to get back home in one piece.  It is during the second half of the book that the story takes some unexpected turns and the result is a heartwarming (but not corny) and uplifting ending.

The dark background on which the monochrome illustrations sit slowly gives way to brighter bursts of colour as the story continues and by the end of the book, the pages are replete with bright, almost neon flares that reflect the atmosphere of the adventure.  If you are curious as to the illustrative style of the book you can visit the author/illustrator’s website and have a look at some of the page spreads. 

I couldn’t read this book and not have a go at creating a little version of Light’s intrepid, and open-minded hero, and here’s what I came up with:

light-1 light-2 light-3

The little guy is pictured here with his backpack, trusty sword and a red gem (which is one of the objects of his quest).  I’m pretty happy with the way he turned out and he has already started exploring the shelf and investigating the other occupants!

If you are uninterested in crochet patterns, you can stop reading now – otherwise, read on for a free pattern to crochet your own little Light dude and his backpack.

Yours in yarn (and unexpected adventure!),

Mad Martha

Free Crochet Pattern inspired by “Light” by Rob Cham

This pattern will allow you to recreate the figure and backpack from the images above and is suitable for beginners with a basic knowledge of amigurumi skills.  The pattern is written using US crochet terms.

You will need:

Yarn (I used acrylic) in white, dark brown and a small amount of black for the eyes.

4 mm hook

Yarn needle

Scissors

Stitch marker

Head:

Using white yarn and 4mm hook, make a magic ring.

  1. Sc 6 in the ring.
  2. 2sc in each sc (12)
  3. *sc in next sc, 2sc in next sc* x 6 (18)
  4. * sc in next 2 sc, 2sc in next sc* x 6 (24)
  5. sc in each sc around (24).
  6. sc in each sc around (24)
  7. sc in each sc around (24)
  8. sc in the next 12 sc; *sc in the next sc, 2sc in the next sc* in the next 12 sc (30)
  9. sc in each sc around (30)
  10. sc in the next 12 sc; *sc in the next sc, 2sc in the next sc* in the next 18 sc (39)
  11. sc in each sc around (39)
  12. sc in the next 12 sc; *sc in the next sc, sc2tog in the next 2 sc* in the next 27 sc (30)
  13. sc in each sc around (30)
  14. sc in the next 12 sc; *sc in the next sc, sc2tog in the next 2 sc* in the next 18 sc (24)
  15. sc in each sc around (24)
  16. * sc in next 2 sc, sc2tog in next sc* x 6 (18)
  17. *sc in next sc, sc2tog in next sc* x 6 (12)
  18. Turn head right side out and stuff.  Continue by making sc2tog x6 (6)
  19. FO leaving a long tail.  Thread a yarn needle onto the tail, weave the tail in between the final six sc, pull tight and FO again.

Eyes:

Using black yarn, thread the yarn through a yarn needle and make a knot at the end of the tail.  Insert the needle at the base of the head (where you fastened off from stitching the hole closed) and bring the needle out on one side of the face at about round 7 (just before the face bows outward).  Make a single, straight stitch to form one eye.  Bring the yarn needle out on the same round, a few single crochets from the first eye.  Make another single, straight stitch to form the second eye.  Bring the needle out at the base of the head, FO and hide the tail of yarn inside the head.

Body and legs/feet:

Using white yarn and 4mm hook, make a magic ring.

1.Sc 6 in the ring.

2. 2sc in each sc (12)

3. *sc in next sc, 2sc in next sc* x 6 (18)

4. * sc in next 2 sc, 2sc in next sc* x 6 (24)

5 – 14: For the next 10 rounds, sc in each sc around (24)

15.  Begin the first leg by making one sc in the next 8 sc.  Skip the remaining 16 sc in the round and sc into the first sc you made in this round.   Place a stitch marker in this sc.

16 – 18. sc in each of the eight sc you have just made, for three rounds.

19.  Begin shaping the feet.  Sc in the next 3 sc, 2sc in the next 4 sc, sc in the last sc (12)

20.  sc in the next 4 sc, sc2tog in the next 4 sc, sc in the next sc (8)

21.  Sc2tog x 4 (4)

22. FO leaving a tail.  Thread the yarn needle onto the tail of yarn and whip stitch the opening on the bottom of the foot closed.  FO and hide the remaining yarn by threading it inside the leg.

23.  Begin the second leg by counting 4 sc from where the first leg attaches to the body.  Attach the yarn in the next sc with a slip stitch, and sc in the next 8 sc. (8)

24.  Repeat the process from round 16 to round 22 to create the second leg.

25.  Stuff the body through the opening at the bottom, using a crochet hook or other small poking device to ensure the stuffing fills out the feet.  Stitch the remaining single crochets at the bottom of the body closed, FO and weave in the tail of yarn.

Arms (Make 2)

Using white yarn and a 4mm hook, make a magic ring.

  1. sc 6 in the ring.
  2. *sc in the next 2 sc, 2sc in the next sc* x 2 (8)
  3. sc in each sc around (8)
  4. *sc in the next 2 sc, sc2tog in the next 2 sc* x 2 (6)
  5.  Sc in each sc (6)
  6. Repeat round 5 five times.
  7. FO, leaving a long tail for attaching to the body.
  8. Stuff

Backpack

Using brown yarn and a 4mm hook, make a magic ring.

  1. Sc 6 in the ring.
  2. 2sc in each sc (12)
  3. *sc in next sc, 2sc in next sc* x 6 (18)
  4. * sc in next 2 sc, 2sc in next sc* x 6 (24)
  5. sc in each sc (24)
  6. Repeat round 5 four times.
  7. Begin working on the flap.  Sc in the next 10 sc. (10)
  8. Ch 1, turn, sc in each sc (10)
  9. Ch 1, turn, sc2tog, sc in the next 6 sc, sc2tog (8)
  10. Ch 1, turn, sc2tog, sc in the next 4 sc, sc2tog, (6)
  11. Ch 1, turn, sc in each sc (6)
  12. Ch 1, turn, sc2tog, sc in the next 2 sc, sc2tog (4)
  13. Ch 1, turn, sc in each sc (4)
  14. Ch 1, turn, sc2tog twice (2)
  15. Ch 5, and sc in the next sc to make a closing loop for the backpack.
  16. Ch 1, turn, sc in each sc around the top of the backpack.  FO, weave in the ends and turn right side out.

Straps (make 2)

Attach yarn in the sc next to where the flap joins the open top of the backpack.  Chain 5, FO and using a yarn needle, attach the free end of the chain to the bottom of the backpack.

Sew a french knot on the front of the backpack big enough for the closing loop to fit around.  Now you’re dude can open and close his pack!

Attaching the bits and pieces:

Sew the head to the body, lining up the back of the head with the back of the body.  This ensures that the dude’s bulbous nose sticks out a bit more in the front.  Attach the arms on either side, close to where the head is joined.  Slip the backpack straps over the arms and you have an adventurer!

This pattern is provided for free.  Please don’t steal it and use it as your own.  You are welcome to make as many adventurer dudes as you like to keep or give as gifts.

 

 

Yarning with Mad Martha about Nobody Likes a Goblin (+ a free crochet pattern!)

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yarning with mad martha_Fotor (2)

Cheerio my dears!  Today is a red-letter day because not only do I have a wonderful picture book and pattern for you, I can also reveal that today’s book – Nobody Likes a Goblin by Ben Hatke – is a Top Book of 2016 Pick!  The perfect choice for little (and large!) dungeon-crawlers everywhere, this gorgeous picture book turns RPG adventuring on its head and presents events from the point of view of the supposed villain.

Bruce's Pick

After having seen the tome on Netgalley and writhing in agony because it was offered by First Second Books, who don’t accept review requests from outside the U.S., we spotted it in PanMacmillan Australia’s catalogue and were THRILLED to be lucky enough to receive a copy.  Honestly, you should have seen Bruce leaping and twirling when the book turned up on the shelf!  I won’t keep you in any more suspense however – here’s the blurb from Goodreads:

Goblin, a cheerful little homebody, lives in a cosy, rat-infested dungeon, with his only friend, Skeleton. Every day, Goblin and Skeleton play with the treasure in their dungeon. But one day, a gang of “heroic” adventurers bursts in. These marauders trash the place, steal all the treasure, and make off with Skeleton—leaving Goblin all alone!

It’s up to Goblin to save the day. But first he’s going to have to leave the dungeon and find out how the rest of the world feels about goblins.

nobody likes a goblin.jpg

I cannot praise this book highly enough.  Putting aside the charming and fun illustrations for the moment, the text of this book is incredibly sympathetic to Goblin’s plight, as his home is rudely invaded by adventurous “heroes” and the little introvert must take to the big wide hostile world for the sake of those he values.  My favourite part of the tale is when, after rescuing his friends from the hands of the adventurers, Goblin and his stalwart mate Skeleton are pictured quietly sitting together in the mouth of a cave, “awaiting their doom” while angry, pitch-fork wielding townsfolk amass above.

There’s something really touching about Goblin and the bonds of friendship he forms by the end of the tale.  For young readers who enjoy the RPG gaming world that encompasses the tropes that are reversed here, this will be a wonderfully affirming story that will provide a link between their reading and screen-based worlds.  It has already become a firm favourite amongst the mini-fleshlings in this dwelling, with the youngest (two and three-quarter years old) often calling out for “Nobody don’t like a goblin” as the preferred bedtime story.

We unanimously voted this a Top Book of 2016 pick and we think that Goblin and his friends will fill that special place of all memorable characters from childhood reading experiences.  For that reason, my dears, allow me to provide you with a free pattern to make your very own amigurumi crochet Goblin, so you can oppose anti-goblin sentiments while creating a cuddly little friend !  Read on for the pattern.

goblin and bruce 1_Fotor

We are also submitting this book for the Alphabet Soup Reading Challenge hosted by Escape with Dollycas:

alphabet soup challenge 2016

You can check out our progress toward that challenge here.

Yours in yarn,

Mad Martha

goblin and book 2_Fotor

Free Crochet Pattern – Goblin

This pattern is a bit fiddly, so is probably best suited to those with some experience of amigurumi.  The pattern is written using US crochet terms.

You will need:

Yarn (I used acrylic) in brown, blue, green, white, black, yellow.

4 mm hook

2.5 mm hook

Yarn needle

Scissors

Head/helmet:

Using brown yarn and 4mm hook, make a magic ring.

  1. Sc 6 in the ring.
  2. 2sc in each sc (12)
  3. *sc in next sc, 2sc in next sc* x 6 (18)
  4. * sc in next 2 sc, 2sc in next sc* x 6 (24)
  5. sc in each sc around (24).  Switch to green yarn.
  6. sc in each sc around (24)
  7. sc in each sc around (24)
  8. *sc in next 2 sc, sc2tog* x 6 (18). Begin stuffing head.
  9. *sc in next sc, sc2tog* x 6 (12)
  10. *sc in next sc, sc2tog* x 4 (8)
  11. sc2tog x 4 (4).  Sl st in next st, snip yarn and thread yarn tail through last four sc.  Pull tight and fasten off.

Helmet guard

Using brown yarn and 4mm hook, chain 20.  Slip stitch in the first chain to form a ring.

  1. sc in the next 10 ch, dc in the next 10 ch, sl st to the first sc
  2. Ch 2, turn, dc in next 10 stitches
  3. Ch 2, turn, hdc in next 3 stitches, dc in next 4 stitches, hdc in next 3 stitches.

Fasten off, leaving a long tail, and stitch to the bottom rim of the helmet, with the longer section at the back of the head.

Horns (make 2)

Using white yarn and a 2.5 mm hook, chain 6.

  1. Sc in 2nd chain from the hook and in each chain (5)
  2. Ch 1, turn, sc in each sc (5)
  3. Ch 1, turn, sc2tog, sc, sc2tog (3)
  4. Ch 1, turn, sc in each stitch (3)
  5. Ch 1, turn, sc2tog, sc (2)
  6. Ch 1, turn, sc in each stitch (2)
  7. Ch 1, turn, sc2tog, sl st to FO.

Whip stitch the two sides of the triangle together and sew onto either side of the helmet.

Eyes (make 2)

Using white yarn and a 2.5 mm hook, make a magic ring.

  1. Sc 6 in the ring.  Sl st to the first sc to close.

FO, embroider a black pupil in the centre and sew to face, slightly overlapping the rim of the helmet.

Jaw

Using green yarn and a 2.5mm hook, chain 13.

  1. sc in second chain from the hook and in each stitch across (12)
  2. Ch 1, turn, sl st in the next 3 sc, dc in next sc, sc in the next sc, sl st in the next sc, dc in the next sc, sl st in the next 3sc.

Fasten off leaving a long tail.  Attach to the bottom of the head, and using brown yarn, embroider along the top of the lip.

Nose 

Using green yarn and a 2.5mm hook, ch 4.

  1. sc in 2nd chain from the hook and in each chain (3)
  2. Ch 1, turn, sc2tog, sc (2)
  3. Ch 1, turn, sc2tog (1)

Fasten off and whip stitch two sides of the triangle together to form the nose.  Attach to face.

Body/Legs

Using brown yarn and a 4mm hook, complete pattern for the head up to and including round 4.

1-5. Sc in each sc around (24)

6. Switch to blue yarn.  Sc in each sc around (24)

7. Sc in next 12 sc, skip next 12 sc, sl st in the 1st sc (12)

8-10. Sc in next 12 sc (12)

Change to brown yarn.

11. Sc in next 12 sc (12)

12. sc in next 5 sc, 2sc in next 3 sc, sc in next 5sc (20)

13. Sc in the next 8 sts, dc in the next 4 sts, sc in the next 8 sc (20)

Stuff leg and body.  FO, Cut yarn and whip stitch bottom of leg closed to form boot.

Attach blue yarn in the first remaining sc on the body and repeat pattern from row 11 to form second leg/boot.

Arms (make 2)

Using blue yarn and a 4mm hook, make a magic ring.

1.Sc 6 in the ring

2-4. Sc in each st (6)

5. Switch to brown yarn. Sc in each st (6)

6-7.  Sc in each sc (6)

Stuff the arm, squeeze the opening shut and sl st across the opening.  Ch 3 picot 5 times to form fingers.  FO and attach to body.

Shoulder guards (make 2)

Using blue yarn and a 4mm hook, chain 7.

  1. Sc in 2nd chain from the hook and in each ch across (6)
  2. Ch 2, turn, hdc in each st across (6)
  3. Ch 1, turn, sc, dc in the next 4 sts, sc (6)

Fasten off and attach to the top of the arm.

Belt/Armour

Using brown yarn and a 2.5 mm hook, chain 30 and sl st with the first chain to form a ring.

  1. Ch 1, sc in each chain (30)
  2. Fur stitch (long) in the next 5 st, sc in the next 5sc, fur stitch in the next 5 st, sc in the next 5 sts, fur stitch in the next 5 sts, sl st to first st. (30)

FO, leaving a long tail.  Snip the loops of the fur stitch and sew the belt to the tummy over the join where the blue yarn changes to brown.Make sure the fur stitch sections are at the front and back, not the sides.  For the shoulder strap, chain the required length (to fit from belt, over shoulder, to belt at the back), ch 1, sc in each chain, then FO and sew shoulder strap into place.

Crown

Using yellow yarn and a 2.5mm hook, chain 30 and sl st into the first chain to form a ring.

  1. Sc in each chain (30)
  2. *Ch 5 picot (sl st, ch 5 and sl st in the same stitch), sc in the next 3 sc* repeat to end.  Sl st in final st.

FO, weave in end.

goblin and book 1_Fotor

 

 

 

 

 

Yarning with Mad Martha about The Birth of Kitaro! (+ a free crochet pattern)

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yarning with mad martha_Fotor (2)

I am so happy to be with you today my dears for it has fallen to me to introduce you to one of the shelf’s new heroes (and provide you with a free crochet pattern of course!).  We received today’s graphic novel, The Birth of Kitaro by Shigeru Mizuki from PanMacmillan Australia (thanks!) for review and we just fell in love with the little one-eyed yokai boy Kitaro.  Having read Mizuki’s graphic memoir, NonNonBa, a year or so ago, we knew we were likely in for a treat with this collection of short paranormal fiction stories, but we weren’t prepared for how fun and endearing Kitaro would end up being.  But enough shilly-shallying: without further ado, I present to you: The Birth of Kitaro! Here’s the blurb from Goodreads.

Meet one of Japan’s most popular characters of all time-Kitaro, the One-Eyed Monster Boy

The Birth of Kitaro collects seven of Shigeru Mizuki’s early, and beloved, Kitaro stories, making them available for the first time in English, in an all-new, kid-friendly format. These stories are from the golden era of the late 1960s, when Gegege no Kitaro truly hit its stride as an all-ages supernatural series. Mizuki’s Kitaro stories are both timelessly relevant and undeniably influential, inspiring a decades-long boom in stories about yokai, Japanese ghosts, and monsters.

“Kitaro’s Birthday” reveals the origin story of the yokai boy Kitaro and his tiny eyeball father, Medama Oyaji. “Neko Musume versus Nezumi Otoko” is the first of Mizuki’s stories to feature the popular recurring character Neko Musume, a little girl who transforms into a cat when she gets angry or hungry. Other stories in The Birth of Kitaro draw heavily from Japanese folklore, with Kitaro taking on legendary Japanese yokai like the Nopperabo and Makura Gaeshi, and fighting the monstrous recurring villain Gyuki.

With more than 150 pages of spooky and often funny comics about the titular yokai boy, The Birth of Kitaro is the perfect introduction to the award-winning author Mizuki’s most popular series, seminal comics that have won the hearts of Japanese children and adults for more than half a century.

kitaro

So although Kitaro is new to us, he has been kicking around in Japan for many a good long year and is well known there as the yokai boy who is available to assist with all your yokai-removal needs, possessing, as he does, the powers of his Ghost Tribe ancestors.  The book is presented in traditional manga format, so younger readers will no doubt find great amusement in having to read from the back of the book to the front.  Before the comics start there is a short introduction explaining Kitaro’s popularity in Japan and some background about the author.  Then we dive straight in to the story of Kitaro’s birth, in which you will meet possibly the most delightful and charming ghost/zombie/undead couple upon which one could ever lay eyes.  These darling creatures are Kitaro’s yokai parents, and their only desire is to find a safe place for Kitaro to grow up before they perish for good.

Following on from this are bite-sized chunks of adventuresome goodness, as Kitaro steps in to assist with all manner of unearthly problems.  These include, but are not limited to, giant sea-cow-crab monsters, face-stealing spirits and shape-shifting cat people.  While they didn’t particularly scare us as adult readers, the stories are full of strange beings and a mythical world that I suspect most westerners wouldn’t be familiar with, so I think younger readers will appreciate this more as “horror” or at the very least, strange ghost stories, while older readers will just revel in the fun and oddity of it all.  The stories all have a tiny bit of a moral, usually related to someone or other behaving in a way that brings misery down upon themselves.  The individual stories are easy to follow and I can picture the excitement imaginative youngsters would experience on discovering Kitaro and his adventures for the first time.

At the back of the book are a few unexpected and fun activities, including a yokai wordsearch, a drawing activity, a “spot the difference” puzzle and a run-down of all the yokai featured in the stories and their geographical origins. Overall, this is an extremely impressive package and it is clear that the creators of the book have gone to great lengths to make it kid-friendly.

We at the shelf would recommend this book most highly to young readers in the middle grade age bracket or older, who are either capable readers or fans of graphic novels (or both!) and are looking for tales that are good, clean, paranormal fun.

We just loved meeting Kitaro and will definitely be seeking out the second collection of stories (whikitaro eyeball 2ch was published a number of years back) posthaste.

Now is probably the ideal time to point out that in the first story in the collection – that involving Kitaro’s birth –  we came across a character who stole the show and quickly became our favourite little disembodied (then re-embodied) eyeball of all time.  We speak of Medama Oyaji, Kitaro’s father (pictured on the cover above – the green gentleman), who, after the decomposition of his undead body, resolves into a single, sentient and extremely active eyeball.   Recreating this charming little father-figure was just too tempting to pass up and it is for that reason that I am now able to offer you….

A Free Medama Oyaji Amigurumi Crochet Pattern!

As ever, the pattern is written using American terminology, because that’s how I learned first.

You will need:

4mm crochet hook

A large amount of white yarn and smaller amounts of black yarn and the colour you would like to use for the iris (I used green).

A small amount of stuffing

A yarn needle

Scissors

Special stitches:

3dc cluster: make 3 dc in the same st.  Before completing the final dc, remove the hook, place it from back to front in the first dc you made.  Pass the hook through the last dc of the cluster, yo and pull through the first and last double crochet stitches.  This will create a little bobble.

Eyeball (Head)

Using white yarn, make a magic ring and crochet six sc in the ring

  1. inc (2sc in each sc) around (12)
  2. *sc in next sc, inc* x 6 (18)
  3. *sc in the next 2sc, inc* x 6 (24)
  4. *sc in the next 3sc, inc* x 6 (30)
  5. *sc in the next 4sc. inc* x 6 (36)
  6. *sc in the next 5 sc, inc* x 6 (42)
  7. *sc in the next 5sc, sc2tog* x 6 (36)
  8. *sc in the next 4sc, sc2tog* x 6 (30)
  9. *sc in next 3sc, sc2tog* x 6 (24)
  10. *sc in the next 2sc, sc2tog* x 6 (18) Turn eyeball right side out and stuff
  11. *sc, sc2tog* x 6 (12)
  12. sc2tog x 6 (6).  FO.  Thread yarn needle and weave end in and out of final six sc.  Pull tight to close the hole, FO and weave in the yarn end.

Body and Legs

Using white yarn, ch12 and sl st into the first ch to form a circle (12)

1-3. sc in each stitch (12)

4. sc in the next 3sc, 2sc in the next 6sc, sc in the next 3sc (18)

5-6 sc in each sc (18)

Sc in the next 4 sc, to move the beginning st to the centre of the figure’s back

Beginning of first leg:

7. sc in the next 9sc, skip 9sc and sl st into the initial sc to join

8-11  sc in each sc of the first leg (9)

12. *sc, sc2tog* x 3 (6)

13-14. sc in each sc (6)

15. sc2tog x 3 (3)   kitaro eyeball 3

FO.  Cut yarn and pull tight.  Using yarn needle, weave in ends.

Join new yarn in the next unworked sc of round 7.

Repeat rounds 8 to 15 to create the second leg. FO, weave in ends.

Stuff the body and legs lightly and attach to the bottom of the eyeball/head.

Arms (make 2)

Using white yarn make a magic ring and sc 6 into the ring.

1 – 5. Sc in each sc (6)

6. sc in next sc, 3dc cluster in the next sc, sc in next 2sc, 3dc cluster in the next sc, sc in the next sc (6)

7. Sc2tog x 3 (3)

FO, weave in end.  Attach arm to body.

Pupil

Using black yarn, make a magic ring and sc 6 into the ring.  Sl st into the first sc.  Pull the ring to close, but leave a small hole.

Change to white yarn.

  1. Ch 1, 2sc in each sc.  Sl St in the first sc to join (12)
  2. Ch1, *sc in the next sc, inc* x 6, sl st in the first sc to join (18)

Change to black yarn

3. Sl st in each sc around (18)

FO.

Using the colour of your choice, embroider colour lines onto your pupil, adding a small white square in the original black magic ring.

Attach your pupil to your eyeball/head.

Display your work proudly!

kitaro eyeball 1

So there you have it my dears!  A fantastic paranormal adventure tome and a cute, cuddly eyeball for your very own.  You can thank me later when all  your friends are begging you to make them a charming eyeball companion.

Cheerio my dears,

Mad Martha

 

 

Yarning with Mad Martha about…the Edgar books (+ a free crochet pattern)!

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yarning with mad martha_Fotor (2)

Cheerio my dears!  If you are a fan of the delightfully macabre Edgar Allan Poe, then today’s books are sure to have you quivering with excitement!  Recently we managed to get our paws on some books that have been on our TBR list for a while and just as we suspected, they were a hit with the shelf-denizens AND the mini-fleshlings!  edgar and the cover_Fotor

I speak of the Edgar series of books, part of the Babylit range by Jennifer Adams, that introduces the tiniest of fleshlings to literary classics.  While most of this range are in the form of primers, the Edgar series bumps things up a bit, with more text, a story loosely based on the originals and a gorgeous pair of protagonists that you can’t help but fall in love with….and of course, recreate in yarnful glory.

The first book in the series is Edgar Gets Ready for Bed, inspired by Poe’s famous poem, The Raven.  Following on from this we have Edgar and the Tattle-Tale Heart and most recently, Edgar and the Fall of the Tree House of Usher…I’m pretty sure you can guess the titles of the poems upon which these last two are based.

edgar gets ready for bed

edgar and the tattle tale heart

tree house of usher

Sadly for us, our library only had the second two books in the series, so we’re still hanging out to read about Edgar and getting ready for bed (“Nevermore!”) but the second two books were hugely enjoyable.  The older mini-fleshling particularly loved the Tree House of Usher with its initial “No Girls Allowed” theme, while the younger mini-fleshling enjoyed seeing Lenore (Edgar’s younger sister) finally receive the recognition that she deserved.

edgar face to face_Fotor Even if you haven’t read the original poems (in which camp I fully admit to sitting), the stories stand well in their own right.  For those who are more familiar with Poe’s work however, you will find plenty of motifs in both the text and Ron Stucki’s darling illustrations.  The books are available in paperback and hardback as well as board book (our favourite!) formats, so there will be a perfect edition for mini-fleshlings of any age.  We’d definitely recommend Poe fans and Poe fans-to-be check these out (either with your eyes, or from the library – we did both!) at your earliest convenience!

edgar on a bust

Edgar quickly found a bust on which to perch

 

Now, on to the crochet pattern!  I will admit that this pattern may have a few small errors in it, as I tried to render Edgar’s head and  body in one single piece, rather than attaching a beak separately.  The pattern is written in US crochet terms because that’s how I learned first.

What you will need:

Black yarn

Small amount of white yarn

3.5mm crochet hook

Stitch marker

Pipe cleaners or thin wire

Scissors

Yarn needle

Head, beak and body

Using black yarn, make a magic ring and crochet 6 sc in the ring

  1. 2sc in each sc around (12)
  2. *2sc in the next sc, sc* repeat x 6 (18)
  3. Sc in the next 6 sc; 2sc in the next 6 sc; sc in the next 6 sc (24)
  4. Sc in the next 8 sc; ch 1, turn (8)
  5. Repeat round 4 (8)
  6. Repeat round 4 (8)
  7. Sc in next 8 sc, then continue in the round sc in the next 16 sc (24)
  8. Sc2tog; sc in the next 4sc; sc2tog, ch 1, turn (6)
  9. Sc in next 6 sc, ch 1 turn (6)
  10. Repeat round 9 (6)
  11. Sc in next 6 sc, then continue in the round sc in the next 14 sc (20)
  12. Sc2tog, sc in the next 2 sc, Sc2tog, ch 1, turn (4)
  13. Sc in the next 4 sc, ch1, turn (4)
  14. Repeat round 13 (4)
  15. Sc2tog, sc2tog, ch1, turn (2)
  16. Sc in the next 2 sc, ch 1, turn 90 degrees (2)
  17. Sc down the edge of the beak and continue with 1 sc in each sc and back up the beak, back to the point of the beak
  18. Repeat round 17
  19. Repeat round 17
  20. Repeat round 17
  21. . Sc in the next 8 sc (place a stitch marker here!), sc in the next 18 sc, SKIP the stitches that make up the beak, slip stitch in the sc with the stitch marker. Stuff the head a little here if you wish. (26)
  22. 2sc in the SAME sc, sc in the next st; *2sc in next sc, sc in the next sc* repeat 5 times (27)
  23. *2sc in the next st, sc in the next sc* repeat 6 times (41)
  24. Sc in each sc around (41)
  25. Repeat round 24
  26. Repeat round 24
  27. Repeat round 24
  28. Repeat round 24
  29. *Sc2tog, sc in the next sc* repeat 6 times (27)
  30. *Sc2tog, sc in the next sc* repeat 6 times (18)
  31. *Sc2tog, sc in the next sc* repeat 6 times (12)
  32. Stuff the body and head here.
  33. Sc2tog repeat 6 times (6)
  34. Sc around (6)
  35. Fasten off leaving a long tail. Using the yarn needle, weave the tail through the last round of sc, pull tight, knot and snip remaining tail off.

Finishing the beak

Using the yarn needle and black yarn, whip stitch the open stitches at the bottom of the beak together.  Tie off and snip remaining yarn away.

Tail

Using black yarn, make a magic ring and crochet 6 sc in the ring.

  1. Sc in each sc around (6)
  2. Repeat round 1 eight more times
  3. Flatten the tail, fasten off leaving a long tail and attach to the back of Edgar’s body at a jaunty angle.

Wings (Make 2)

Using black yarn, make a magic ring and crochet 6 sc in the ring.

  1. 2sc in each sc around (12)
  2. Repeat round 1, three more times
  3. Flatten, and sc across the opening
  4. *Ch 6, sl st in the next sc* repeat 3 times
  5. Fasten off and attach to Edgar’s body, with chains facing tail.

Eyes (make 2)

Using white yarn, make a magic ring and crochet 6sc in the ring.  Sl st into the first sc.  Close the ring tight, fasten off and stitch onto Edgar’s face.  Use black yarn to embroider pupils.

Hair

Using two short strands of black yarn, surface slip stitch to the top of Edgar’s head.  Knot and pull tight.

Legs (Make 2)

Cut your pipe cleaner or wire into two short sections of about 1.5cm.

Using black yarn, ch 1, sc over the pipe cleaner until your pipe cleaner is covered in sc stitches.

Ch 6, attach to the final sc on the pipe cleaner with a sl st. Repeat twice more.

Fasten off and attach leg to Edgar’s body firmly.

edgar and brucey_Fotor

I hope that these instructions are easy enough to follow.  Of course, if you’d like to make a little Lenore to keep Edgar company (as well as to keep a beady eye on him!) you can follow the pattern above and just add a small bow to the head.

Until we meet again, I am,

Yours in yarn,

Mad Martha

 

 

Yarning with Mad Martha about…New Adventures for Grug (+ a free Grug crochet pattern!)

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yarning with mad martha_Fotor (2)

I’m very pleased to be with you today to chat about some new release books featuring everyone’s favourite bipedal Burrawang tree – Grug!  If you are not familiar with Grug, I am assuming it is because you live outside of Australia, because Grug is an Aussie icon of some 36 years standing, and today, thanks to Simon & Schuster (Grug’s publisher since 2009) I can present to you Grug Gets Lost and Grug Meets a Dinosaur.

If this weren’t exciting enough, I have also knocked together a free crochet pattern so that YOU can make your VERY OWN GRUG! (Provided you know how to crochet, of course).

For those still scratching their heads, Grug is a peaceful, industrious little bush creature who gained sentience when the top of a Burrawang tree fell to the ground.  Here is a Burrawang tree:

Macrozamia_moorei01

And here is Grug:

grug

And here’s the little Grug that you could make for yourself, posing with his two latest adventures:

grug and books completed

In Grug Gets Lost, poor old Grug is returning home with his shopping basket when he detours around a fallen log blocking the path and ends up grug-gets-lost-9781925030518_lgin a part of the bush he’s never been before.  Grug becomes a bit nervous as the dark shadows play tricks on his eyes and he ends up spending the night alone in the bush.  Come morning though, our grassy hero navigates his way safely back to his cosy burrow to unpack his shopping.

This book quickly became the older mini-fleshling’s favourite read of the moment, which was a surprise to we shelf-dwellers.  We have tried to enamour him of Grug before and it never worked, but for some reason this particular adventure has turned him into a die-hard Grug fan!  Grug Gets Lost actually manages to pack an emotional roller coaster into just a few pages but this is tempered by Grug’s calm, assured attitude to life.  As always, our hero takes things as they come and we, as readers, are reassured that things will likely turn out well in the end.

In Grug Meets a Dinosaur, Grug is on his way for a swim in the creek whengrug-meets-a-dinosaur-9781925030525_lg he stumbles upon a creature resembling a dinosaur, sitting on a rock.  After a comedy of errors in which Grug and “dinosaur” engage in an ungainly two-step of chase and escape, Cara, Grug’s python friend, points out that the dinosaur is, in fact, a goanna and we are again reassured – mostly through Cara’s laconic acknowledgement of the fact – that nothing was ever amiss.

This one also warranted a few re-readings, but the mini-fleshling was most impressed with the list of Grug back-titles on offer inside the back cover of the book.  Having the opportunity to re-engage with Grug as a grown-up and seeing a whole new generations’ enjoyment of this unique character has been great fun.  While all around us the world seems to be going mad, at least we have Grug – steadfast, reassuring, low-tech Grug (although he does have his own website!) – to turn back to.

And the small size of the books makes them perfect as stocking fillers, don’t you think?

A meeting of the minds

A meeting of the minds

Now, if you aren’t a yarny type, you can probably finish reading here, but for all those desperate to know how to make their own Grug plushie, read on for the free pattern created by me – Mad Martha!

Amigurumi Grug – Free Crochet Pattern

You will need:

Yarn – I used cheap acrylic from my stash – in yellow and brown.  One skein of each colour will be plenty.

Smaller amounts of yarn in peach or pink (for facial features) and black (for eyes and mouth)

Yarn needle

4.5mm crochet hook (or the right size to suit the yarn you are using)

A small amount of stuffing

*This pattern is written in American crochet terms because that’s how I learned first.  I haven’t written too many patterns, so this one might have a few mistakes. Sorry in advance*

Body – worked from the bottom up

  1. Starting with brown yarn, make a magic ring.  Ch 3 and work 11 dc into the magic ring.  Join with a sl st to the top of the ch 3. (12)
  2. Ch 3, dc in the same stitch.  1 dc in the next st.  *2dc in the next st, 1 dc in next st* around.  Join with a sl st to the top of the ch 3. (18)
  3. Ch 3, dc in the same st.  *2dc in each stitch* around. Join with a sl st (36)
  4. Ch 3, dc in the same st.  1 dc in the next st. *2dc in the next st, 1 dc in the next st* around. Join with sl st. (54)
  5. Ch 3, dc in the same st.  *2dc in next st, 1 dc in next 2 st* around.  Join with sl st (72)
  6. From now on, work in spirals (don’t join the rounds).  Sc around (72)
  7. Sc around (72)
  8. Change to yellow yarn.  Sc around (72)
  9. Sc around (72)
  10. *Sc2tog, sc in the next 2 st* 18 times (54)
  11. sc around (54)
  12. Change to brown yarn. Sc around (54)
  13. *Sc2tog, sc in next 2 stitches* 14 times (42)
  14. Sc around (42)
  15. Change to yellow yarn. Sc around (42)
  16. *Sc2tog, sc in the next 2 st* 10 times (30)
  17. Sc around (30)
  18. Change to brown yarn. *Sc2tog, sc in the next 2 st* 7 times (21)
  19. Sc around (21)
  20. Sc around (21)
  21. Turn inside out and stuff.  Change to yellow yarn. *Sc2tog, sc in the next 2 st* 6 times (18)
  22. *Sc2tog, sc in the next st* 6 times (12)
  23. Sc2tog around (6)
  24. Using yarn needle, thread long tail in a running stitch through the final round of stitches and pull to close.  FO.
Hair
Using short lengths of yellow yarn, insert crochet hook into stitches at the top of Grug’s head, YO and pull up a loop.  YO both strands and pull through in a sl st to fasten.
Nose – using pink or peach yarn, working in spiral
1. Make a magic ring and sc 6 into the ring
2. 2sc in each st around (12)
3. *2sc, sc in the next st* 6 times  (18)
4. *2sc, sc in the next 2st* 6 times (24)
5 – 6. sc around (24)
7. 2sc, sc in the next 2st* 6 times (30)
8. sc around (30)
9. *Sc2tog, sc in the next 3 st* 6 times (24)
10. sc around (24)
11. *Sc2tog, sc in next 2 st* 6 times (18)
12. *Sc2tog, sc in next st* 6 times (12)
Turn inside out.
13-15. sc around (12)
16. Sc2tog 6 times (6)
17. sc around (6)
Flatten your work and sc across the top opening to close.  FO, leaving a long tail for attaching to body.
Eyes – make 2 in pink or peach yarn (working in rounds)
1. Ch 6, sc in second chain from the hook and in the next 3 ch.  3sc in the final chain.  Continuing to work in the remaining loops on the other side of the chain, sc in next 3 ch loops.  2sc in final chain loop.  Join with a sl st to the first sc. (12)
2. Ch 1, 2sc in the same st as the join.  Sc in the next 3 sc.  2 sc in the next sc.  Sc in the next sc. 2 sc in the next sc.  Sc in the next 4 sc.  2sc in the last sc.  Join with a sl st to the first sc. (16)  FO, leaving a long tail for attaching to the body.
Mouth – using peach or pink yarn, working in rounds
1. Ch 5. Sc in the 2nd ch from the hook.  Sc in the next 2 ch.  3 sc in final chain.  Continuing in the remaining ch loops on the opposite side of the ch, sc in the next 2 ch loops.  2sc in the final ch.  Join with a sl st to the first sc. (10) FO leaving a long tail for attaching to the body.
Legs – make two using pink/peach and brown yarn, working in spirals
1. Beginning with pink/peach yarn, make a magic ring and sc 6 into the ring.
2. 2 sc in each st around (12)
3. *2sc, sc in the next st* 6 times (18)
4. *sc in the next 2 st, 2sc in the next st* 6 times (24)
Change to brown yarn
5. *Sc2tog, sc in the next 2 st* 6 times (18)
6 – 7.  Sc around (18)
8. *Sc2tog, sc in the next st* 6 times (12)
9-10.  Sc around (12)
Turn inside out, FO, stuff and attach to body.  Embroider toes using French knots.
Arms – make 2 using pink/peach and brown yarn, working in spirals
1. Beginning with pink/peach yarn, make a magic ring and crochet 6 sc into the ring. (6)
2. 2 sc in each st around (12)
3. *2sc, sc in the next st* 6 times (18)
Change to brown yarn
4.*Sc2tog, sc in the next st* 6 times (12)
5. Sc around (12)
Turn inside out, FO, stuff and attach to body.  Embroider fingers using straight stitch in brown yarn.
Assembly
Using the pictures as a guide, sew nose, eye patches and mouth patch to the body.  Embroider pupils and mouth using black yarn.  Add texture by using straight stitches, placed all over Grug’s body in brown yarn.
Done!  Now you have your very own Grug cuddle buddy.  Again, as this is one of my first patterns, there are more than likely going to be mistakes.  Sorry about that.  Feel free to point them out if you find them.
Cheerio, my dears,
Mad Martha