What I Don’t Know About Plants Will Fit Into This Enormous Book: Botanicum…

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botanicum

I will be the first to admit that I don’t know a great deal about plants.

I would like to.

I have a general interest in things that grow in the earth, particularly species that are native to Australia, but I feel like flora and its related topic of gardening is one of those that is so big and specialised that I don’t know enough about it to know how much I don’t know.

If that makes sense.  Which it probably doesn’t.

I see it as a nebulous topic, let’s say, beyond the reach of knowing of we mortal (stony) folk with just a passing interest.

But when I saw Botanicum by Katie Scott and Katy Willis from Five Mile Press on offer for review, I knew this was my chance to dip a toe into a hitherto unexplored world.  Here’s the blurb from Goodreads:

The 2016 offering from Big Picture Press’s Welcome to the Museum series, Botanicum is a stunningly curated guide to plant life. With artwork from Katie Scott of Animalium fame, Botanicum gives readers the experience of a fascinating exhibition from the pages of a beautiful book. From perennials to bulbs to tropical exotica, Botanicum is a wonderful feast of botanical knowledge complete with superb cross sections of how plants work.

Given that I don’t know much about plants, I thought I would instead explain to you the things you really need to know about Botanicum; those things that will inspire you to make this eye-catching book part of your collection.

1. It’s impressively large.

You know how in some middle grade, usually fantasy stories there might be a scene where some kids stumble across a dusty old book in a forgotten or forbidden library?  They pull it from the shelf and it’s heavy and the paper is thick and it’s filled with arcane knowledge that will provide the key to whatever mysterious problem they have to solve?

This is that book.  (Except for the old, dusty part).  Here’s a picture of me posing beside our copy, to give you an idea of scale:

botanicum-cover-scale

It’s the perfect size to lay out flat on a table or on the floor, so all of your friends can gather round and point enthusiastically at that bit of information that will move your quest forward.  Seriously, the size and format of the book just screams “Enticing information contained within!”

2. It champions white space.

Unusually for a non-fiction tome, Botanicum makes brilliant use of white space to ensure that the reader doesn’t feel like they need a magnifying monocle to read the text.  Here is one of the page spreads to give you an idea:

botanicum-page-spread-2

Each page spread is devoted to a small amount of pertinent information about the plant type in question, accompanied by a page of beautifully illustrated examples of the plant type.  The fact that the book is so big means that the pages lie satisfyingly flat, allowing you to pore over the pages to your heart’s content.  The book covers a wide range of plants, from mosses, fungi and ferns to the giant sequoia, succulents, carnivorous plants, vines and fruit trees.  Truly, if you want to know some basic background about things that grow, or how to tell your hornwort from your hellebore, Botanicum would be a great place to start.

3. It’s eye-poppingly gorgeous to look at.

It’s pretty obvious, from the endpapers to the chapter headings, that the makers of this book know a thing or two about visual design.  Everything about this book is visually appealing – the fonts, the colours, the layout – hell, even a cross-section of a breadfruit made Mad Martha want to pull out her crochet hooks and start recreating it in yarn.  The book has the kind of illustrations that you want to tear out (carefully), frame and put on your wall.  Like this one:

botanicum-wildflowers

And while I’m at it, here’s a glimpse of the gorgeous endpaper designs, that also features in between chapters:

botanicum-page-spread-1

Let’s be honest: even if you know nothing about plants and have no interest in learning about plants, if you pop this one on your coffee table, guests you wish to impress are going to be fooled into thinking you’re a botanical genius.  Or at least a botanical enthusiast.

I get that this is probably a book with a specific, and possibly quite narrow, audience, but do yourself a favour and try and get your hands on a copy of Botanicum, if only to appreciate the beauty of the design.  I am now on a quest to procure a copy of one of the earlier books in the Welcome to the Museum series, Animalium by Jenny Broom and Katie Scott, because I suspect the mini-fleshlings would be bowled over by it.

Many thanks to Five Mile Press for providing us with a copy of Botanicum for review.

Until next time,

Bruce

Small Fry Safari Challenge Haiku Review: Mirror…

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small fryBonjour my lovelies, it is Mad Martha with you today for a haiku review that is doubling as a submission in the Small Fry Safari Kid Lit Readers Challenge.  If you haven’t yet heard about this fantastic and very user-friendly challenge you can click on the attractive button to the right.  If you’d like to take a peek at some of the other challengees’ submissions, you can find them helpfully collated here.

I am pleased to submit the very first entry in category two, which in my opinion is the trickiest of the lot: a book with a piece of furniture in the title.  My submission is Mirror by Jeannie Baker.  I submit it under the sub-clause that a mirror is a furnishing, and therefore fits the category. Hey, it’s my challenge and I can bend the rules if I want to.

mirror

If you haven’t yet encountered Mirror (or indeed, any work by Jeannie Baker), then you, my dear friend, are missing out, for this particular work is a triumph of artistic and conceptual design.  The wordless picture book follows the story of two young boys – one in Sydney, Australia and the other in the Valley of Roses in Morocco.  In an ingenious twist however, the story follows the boys simultaneously across four pages, with each single page folding out to a double page spread, as pictured below.  **Please note that the TARDIS pictured was merely being used to aid in keeping the pages still and has no relation to the events depicted in Mirror. As far as I know, anyway.**

image

In this way, the daily activities of each boy and his family are displayed side by side in glorious detail. On one side, information is displayed in English and on the other, Arabic, and so the book really reflects the concept of “two sides to every story”.  Throughout the book keen-eyed readers are treated to Baker’s trademark collage art and the opportunity to search for repeated motifs across the boys’ activities.  Apart from being a visual treat, the book is also a brilliant starting point for discussing similarities in the lives of those who seem, on the surface, to be living in very different contexts.

So here is my haiku:

Holding a mirror

to our preconceived notions

inspires reflection

 And here’s some more of the artwork to whet your appetite:

   image

image

 Now, I suggest you pursue this title without delay! And there’s still plenty of time to sign up for the Small Fry Safari Kid Lit Readers Challenge – it’s only eight books in total that you have to read to be able to say you have conquered the Safari!  Join us on the Safari bus, we’d love to have you along.

Ta-ra my dears,

Mad Martha

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Haiku Review: The Gashlycrumb Tinies

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Mad Martha again!  I have decided to jump on Bruce’s subversion bandwagon this week and invite The Gashlycrumb Tinies over for a playdate.  Now I have only just recently discovered Edward Gorey, and quite frankly, I am astounded that neither Bruce nor I had encountered him sooner.  For those unfamiliar with Mr Gorey, he seems to be quite fond of the slightly macabre, and as such is a man after my own heart.  I have already become quite enamoured of the delightful tome that will be reviewed here today and would recommend it to anyone with synchronous interest in alphabet books and tales of ghastly death.  Starting with “A is for Amy who fell down the stairs”, this title proceeds to identify 26 diverse circumstances in which one might meet their final demise.  My personal favourite is that befalling poor old “X – is – for – Xerxes” (devoured by mice, and pictured below).  So please enjoy my review of my first, but surely not final, experience with Edward Gorey:

Death, alphabetised:

A brief, cheerful dalliance

with offbeat egress.

Yours in reading!

Mad Martha