Library Larks: Pictures, Pictures, Pictures!

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library larks button proper

It’s all about the pictures with my recent library borrowings.  I went a bit graphic novel mad recently, taking advantage of Moreton Bay Libraries’ most excellent graphic novel collection and have requested no less than eight graphic novels to slowly pore over.  Here are some of them:

liberry larks.jpeg

Chief among these is Ben Hatke’s Zita the Spacegirl, which I borrowed to read in preparation for tackling Return of Zita the Spacegirl for my Mount TBR Challenge.  Jackie from Death by Tsundoku suggested that I read the first book in the series before trying the third, so I duly took her advice!  Look out for reviews of these two later in the week.  I also came across a graphic novel by Isombelle Carmody which I couldn’t just leave lying on the shelf.  I’m very much looking forward to casting my eyes over Bloody Chester, which is horror Western, and Livingstone: Volume 1, which is a manga featuring souls and untimely death.

I’ve also put a few Kazu Kabiushi titles on hold, one of which is an anthology of graphic novel short stories on the theme of mystery boxes.

Hopefully I’ll be able to get some reviews up for some of these in the not too distant future but if not here, I’ll definitely pop some up on Goodreads, so do make sure you are a friend of the Shelf if you happen to use that platform.

What’s on your library list this month?

Until next time,

Bruce

The Cult of Lego: A “Five Things I’ve Learned” Review

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Today’s book is one I picked up on a whim from the library, yet I am happy to report that upon reading it I learned lots of interesting new trivia about everyone’s favourite, foot-stabbing toy, Lego.  The Cult of Lego is a coffee-table sized, photograph-laden romp through the history of the humble, foot-stabbing Lego brick and here’s the blurb from Goodreads:

No, this isn’t a book about joining some fringe cult. It’s a book by LEGO® fans, for LEGO fans, and you and your kids will love it.

In The Cult of LEGO, Wired’s GeekDad blogger John Baichtal andBrickJournal founder Joe Meno take you on a magnificent, illustrated tour of the LEGO community, its people, and their creations.

The Cult of LEGO introduces us to fans and builders from all walks of life. People like professional LEGO artist Nathan Sawaya; enigmatic Dutch painter Ego Leonard (who maintains that he is, in fact, a LEGO minifig); Angus MacLane, a Pixar animator who builds CubeDudes, instantly recognizable likenesses of fictional characters; Brick Testament creator Brendan Powell Smith, who uses LEGO to illustrate biblical stories; and Henry Lim, whose work includes a series of models recreating M.C. Escher lithographs and a full-scale, functioning LEGO harpsichord.

Marvel at spectacular LEGO creations like:

A life-sized Stegosaurus and an 80,000-brick T. Rex skeleton Detailed microscale versions of landmarks like the Acropolis and Yankee Stadium A 22-foot long, 350-pound re-creation of the World War II battleship Yamato A robotic, giant chess set that can replay historical matches or take on an opponent A three-level, remote-controlled Jawa Sandcrawler, complete with moving conveyor belt

Whether you’re a card-carrying LEGO fanatic or just thinking fondly about that dusty box of LEGO in storage, The Cult of LEGOwill inspire you to take out your bricks and build something amazing.

cult-of-lego

And here are Five Things I’ve Learned From The Cult of Lego by John Baichtal and Joe Meno:

1. The first products out of the Lego factory weren’t little connectable bricks at all, but wooden toys – the most famous being a pull-along wooden duck.

2. Lego has been around for so long that its original patents have expired, which is why in recent years multiple products bearing the “Lego-compatible” mark have popped up around the place.

3.   The best selling of Lego’s products to date has been the Mindstorms robotics system.

4. Lego has been used to great effect in Autism therapy programs, as well as in corporate settings to encourage creative problem solving.

5. In accordance with Lego’s tagline, “build your dreams”, clever folk around the world have built everything from functioning ATM and vending machines to prosthetic limbs out of Lego…although my personal favourite creation is the working, floating bug killing device designed by two pioneering Kiwis (the people, not the birds) to overcome the problem of having an uncomfortable number of water insects inhabiting the family pool.

When I checked this one out of the library I expected that it would be the kind of book that I would idly flick through during points of boredom, but I actually ended up reading it cover to cover.  This was no mean feat given that the book is a hefty, coffee-table sized tome, but I like to think that holding it up for long periods counted as exercise.  Beginning at the beginning, the book takes a look at the fascinating history of the toy company that would eventually become the home of the ubiquitous and iconic Lego brick.  The company’s commitment to quality, amongst other things, is clearly one of the reasons why Lego has been around for so long, and has made such an impact on popular culture.

From Lego’s early incarnations, the book moves on to explore the extensive world of AFOLs (Adult Fans of Lego, to the uninitiated) and the “cult” that has built up around the humble toy brick.  You may not be aware of this, but adult Lego fans are everywhere, with their own webcomics, literature, conventions, language, online forums and competitions and if you ever wanted to be part of a hardcore hobbyist community based around a children’s toy, Lego could certainly provide your entry ticket into such a world.  As well as the world of competitive building by adult Lego fans, the book takes a look at Lego as art, Lego as architecture and the ways in which adult builders have taken Lego to whole new levels that could not have been imagined by the company’s founders.   No book on Lego could be complete without a close look at the Minifig phenomenon, and these little guys play a big role in the cult of Lego, influencing everything from the scale of creations to the builders’ choice of avatar in the online and business worlds.

There is a section of the book devoted to Lego and robotics and this was a whole new world for me as I have never particularly dabbled in the Technic sets, let alone the Mindstorms system, which allows users to program robots for all sorts of purposes, from the aforementioned vending machines, to robots designed to solve Rubik’s Cubes.

The point of difference for this book is that it takes a focused look at how a simple interconnected building toy has made such an incredible impact on wider society.  At the same time, it uncovers the vast and complex subculture of adult fans of Lego and the many ways in which the brick has evolved beyond “toy” status, in the hands of grown ups with innovative ambitions.  If you are a fan of Lego, and indeed of social history, I can recommend this book as one to lose yourself in.

In a nod to those adult builders, below is a little selection of photos from the Brisbricks (that’s the Brisbane Lego Fan User Group) display that Mad Martha visited in June of 2016 at Strathpine:

Kudos to the builders that came up with squirrel herding and chickens escaping from KFC!

Until next time,

Bruce

Haiku Review: The (Epic) Tale of a Library Dog…

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Good afternoon lovelies! I have an extra specialmartha and rhythm offering for you today from one of my very special blog-mates, and winner of the prestigious Gargie Award, Rhythm, the library dog!  Yes, today’s poem will honour Rhythm’s first (autobiographical!) tome, Reading with Rhythm: The Tale of a Library Dog. I was hoping she’d go for the pun and make it the “tail” of a library dog, but that’s just me.  The cover says it’s by Janet Mills, but she must have been the assisting typist as the content is very clearly in the voice of the puppy we know and love.

This colourful and appealing picture book delves into the lives of dogs who work for a living, be they therapy dogs, search and rescue dogs, guide dogs for the vision-impaired, hunting dogs, guard dogs or library dogs (the best kind).  Alongside Rhythm’s explanation of the different working roles open to enterprising canines, is a little brief of what the grand lady herself enacts as a dog-about-the-library. Or school. Or Wherever, as the need arises.

The illustrations are very appealing and give the book a fun and engaging overall look.  You can read more about the illustrator, Paul Howell, here at Rhythm’s own blog. Here’s an example, followed by my review:

rhythm illustrations

Pups with a purpose

illustrate the old saying

working like a dog”

Had I been blessed with opposable digits, I would be giving this book two thumbs up.  Suffice to say, it will appeal greatly to the little ones, and would be an interesting side-discussion in early years curriculum relating to roles people (and fur-people) play in the community.

Rhythm’s book is available for purchase at Amazon, and while you’re clicking around, you can check out her blog (and fantastic flair with themed doggy costumes) at www.readingwithrhythm.wordpress.com.

Adios amigos!

Mad Martha

 

Ode to a Library: Mad Martha breaks with tradition…again

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Hello again my fellow blog-opolists! I have decided to make up for my protracted abscence by providing two pieces of poetic proliferation in quick succession.  Today I feel the need to wax lyrical on the glorious and fantastic phenomenon known as “the library”.  I am still amazed that there exists a place – indeed, multiple places! – from which one can literally walk out the door carrying 20 books, with the implicit trust on behalf of the lender that said books will return safe and sound.  Amazing! So please enjoy this Ode which was inspired partly by Bruce’s rambling and random recollections about a book of poems by CJ Dennis that may or may not feature in an upcoming edition of his Retro Reading series….

library card

Who’s the main appointee to lend books out for free?

Come on! Let’s hear it for libraries!

Who welcomes us all into crisp, tome-lined halls?

Give a cheer! Let’s hear it for libraries!

Whose fine, expert staff know their wheat from their chaff

and direct us toward reading glory?

So Stand UP! Lend your EAR!

Let your Voices ring CLEAR

As WE SHOUT OUT IN PRAISE OF

*click click click*

Ahem! Excuse me!

Oh. Yes?

This is a library. You’ll have to keep it down.

Oh, right. Sorry.

*click click click*

(Sotto voce):

So stand up! Lend your ear! Let your voices ring clear

as we shout out in praise of our libraries…

quietly.

And just in case those of you in the back thought you got away with it, Library Cat has something to tell you:

library cat

Consider yourself warned!

Mad Martha

The gargoyle appeals to the fat man in red…

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It is almost unfathomable to think that there exists a kit designed for the individual to create their own lending library at home, and I was not informed.  The shelf gargoyle communication network has seriously dropped the ball on this one.

Yet I am prepared to forgive – and present to you this little gem, complete with stamps, cards, pockets…and the power to fine those who do not return your books!

It is available at ThinkGeek…here: http://www.thinkgeek.com/product/e326/#tabs

Laybuy now for Christmas.

Bruce