Title Fight Reading Challenge: I Want That Love…

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Title Fight Button 2016

Today I bring to you my final contribution for the Title Fight Reading Challenge 2016 with a book for category six (a book with an emotion in the title).  I Want That Love is another truly original mashup of dinosaurs and deep-seated human emotion by Japanese master of quirkiness Tatsuya Miyanishi.  If you are struggling to place Miyanishi’s other work, you can check out our review of You Look Yummy here.  We received a copy of this one from the publisher via Netgalley and here’s the blurb from Goodreads:

Although Tyrannosaurus storms around saying that power is everything in the world, he realizes he is getting weaker with age. After his tail gets bitten in a run-in with Masiakasaurus, some young Triceratops nurse him back to health.

Touched by their innocent hearts, Tyrannosaurus begins to feel love for these new friends–even though he might have eaten them under different circumstances!

So when two Giganotosaurus attack the group, Tyrannosaurus fights them off, holding the children tightly to his body, and sacrificing himself in order to protect them from the Giganotosaurus. The third title in this acclaimed series, I Want That Love explains that love is far more important than power. 

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Let me begin by saying that Miyanishi’s style of writing will not be for everyone.  Some parents will no doubt pick up this book, have a flick through and decide they would rather drink paint than pass such a weird book on to their kids.  I, having no stony offspring, am able to enjoy the utter bizarre joy of watching a violent, baby-dinosaur-chomping T-Rex realise the power of love through a close encounter with advanced age.  In a nutshell, the story follows a T-Rex, who has a penchant for killing and eating weaker and smaller dinos, until he finds himself in a deathly dire situation.  When he himself is attacked by some stronger dinos, the T-Rex is nursed back to health by some utterly adorable little Triceratops kids.  Later, when the baby Triceratops are threatened, T-Rex provides the ultimate sacrifice to save the kids, thus proving that he has learned his lesson about the power of love trumping (yes, I use that word deliberately) the fallacy that strength and power are the things that matter most in life.

I don’t know if the T-Rex and Triceratops are the same ones as appear in You Look Yummy – they look the same, but there are some continuity difficulties if they are – but this book has that same heart-warming punch at the end that will knock your world-weary heart for six.  Even though these books are utterly weird and unlike any other picture books that you will read – seriously, I still can’t decide whether the author intends these to be dark humour or serious moral tale, or indeed whether the translation has anything to do with how they read – there is an incredibly authentic underlying message in each story.  I have a sneaking suspicion that these are actually meant for adults, but I really can’t be sure.

Odd as these books undoubtedly are, we on the Shelf have definitely fallen under their Prehistoric spell and will keep our eyes peeled for any more in the series.  Mad Martha did intend on hooking up a cuddly T-Rex for you, but she couldn’t fit it in, given the time we had to spend this week looking at each other sideways and whispering “What the actual F***?” over the result of the US election.

Happily though, with this title I have COMPLETED THE TITLE FIGHT READING CHALLENGE FOR 2016!!  Hooray!

For any of you who enjoy my reading challenges, I have been working hard on a new challenge for 2017 and will hopefully have information posted here within the next week or two.

Until next time,

Bruce

Blind Servitude: A Haiku Review of a Modern Day Fable (plus an Author Interview!)

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It’s Mad Martha with you today with a special treat! I have a sweet little indie title for your perusing pleasure, made all the sweeter for its having an Australian author (yippee!).  Stay tuned after my review to meet David Chattaway and find out the inspiration behind this engaging little tale.

Blind Servitude by David Chattaway follows the story of Eli, a young boy who, along with his family, has lived his whole life in an underground mine, toiling for an unseen overlord.  When Eli accidentally discovers a secret passage that may lead to freedom (or certain death!) he is excited to tell his family.  But at the same time Eli is uncovering the mine’s secrets, a siren is sounding elsewhere in the mine – a siren indicating that his mother will never be returning from her work shift.  When Eli’s brother and sister are abducted in the regular “harvest”, Eli is more determined than ever to get his father to listen to his plan to find the secret tunnel and see if it leads to escape.  Along the way, Eli will have to dodge the guards, particularly the sadistic “Savage”, evade the creepy “Shadow” lady and rely on his father, blind old Jeri and his mysterious, silent friend Peta in order to risk everything for a slim chance at freedom.

blind servitude

Dwelling in darkness

cage bars built from despair

Will hope find a way?

Blind Servitude is a reasonably short story that has a definite feel of the old-time fable about it.  Eli, the young boy at the centre of the story, is the unlikely hero, shifted from the complacency of his everyday life collecting and repairing tools for the workers by a desire for something more, something adventurous.  He alone has the courage to believe that his mother and siblings may not yet be lost to death, after his discovery of a tunnel that shouldn’t exist, given what the mine-dwellers have always been told.

The story unfolds fairly slowly, given the short length of the book, and this isn’t an action-packed adventure story by any means, despite the fact that there’s climbing and breaking and entering and pursuit by malevolent creatures all bound up in this small package.  Instead the suspense builds slowly, all the time reflecting Eli’s personal growth as he faces challenges that cause him to question everything he has ever known and chases after a slim hope that there could be something better awaiting all the mine-dwellers provided they are prepared to risk letting go of their unhappy, but predictable lives.

The characters aren’t particlarly developed as individuals, but each plays a significant role in Eli’s journey, particularly the guard whom Eli calls the Savage.  The Savage is almost the personification of the mine-dwellers’ misery, subjugating the people  through violence and threats in order to uphold a system that is unjust and ultimately unproductive for all but those at the top of the chain.

Overall this is an ethereal tale that will have you reflecting on the power of hope and the playing-off between risk and reward.

David Chattaway has kindly offered two readers (Australian residents ony) the chance to win a print copy of Blind Servitude.  To enter, simply click on the rafflecopter link below where you’ll find Ts & Cs.

a Rafflecopter giveaway

 

Now it’s time to meet the generous and talented creator of this tale! Welcome, David, to the Shelf!

 

Blind Servitude is a thoroughly thought-provoking tome! Where did the inspiration for the book come from?

I wanted to write a story which was uplifting and had a positive message. It started as a very short story, focusing on a family’s desperation to escape an underground prison. Initially the story was far more science fiction with Aliens being the prison guards. As I began typing the story evolved and changed and I was left with a tale of a boys journey from darkness to light.
A lot of the characters seem to be flawed in one way or another – was this important to you when creating them and how does it impact on the way the story unfolds?
 
The story is about hope and overcoming adversity, but the characters are real and their situation is somewhat hopeless, especially at the beginning. I wanted the reader to relate to Eli, understanding the reasons that drive him to continue but also appreciating that he is challenging the nature of the world he had lived in.
Why did you choose Eli as your protagonist? Was it essential that he be young in order to accomplish his quest?
 
The story is dedicated to my Godson Eli and it was written for younger readers so I wanted to make the protagonist be young. One of the important aspects to this story is Eli convincing his father to believe his reasoning for escape and I felt that trusting someone young, especially when you’re almost blind and surrounded by danger was a message in itself. Eli represents the child in all of us, the innocent and trusting part which believes everything will be okay, that no matter how dark your life is that there is light at the end of the tunnel.
Who is the perfect reader for Blind Servitude and is there a particular message you’d like them to take away from the story?
 
The book is suitable for both young readers and the young at heart…
– Trust your instincts and believe in good prevailing. Seek the truth and never give up! That is the message of this book.
If you had to sum the book up in one sentence, how would you describe it?
 
Blind Servitude is the tale of a young boy’s journey to find his courage in a world where fear is used as a weapon and love is the only light.
Have you got any works in progress that we should watch out for and do you plan to feature gargoyles in any of your future writings?
 
I’ve completed the first draft of a paranormal fantasy novel named Mal’akh. It’s a story about Angels and Demons, good versus evil… it will be book one of a trilogy I have planned.

 

So there you have it.  You can find Blind Servitude on Goodreads here and for those whose literary appetite has been whetted, Bruce will be featuring another of David’s books on the blog in the coming weeks, so keep your eyes peeled.
Until we meet again, may the light of hope never be blown out,

Mad Martha

 

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Fiction in 50 February Challenge: Love in the time of…

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Welcome one and all to the February Fiction in 50 Challenge!  Every month for Fi50 we ask brave and creative fleshlings (like you!) to take on the challenge of creating a piece of fiction based on a prompt in 50 words or less.  Last month we had a number of new faces that threw their assorted headwear into the ring and as a result we had a nicely diverse range of responses to the prompt.  If you would like to participate or find out about future months’ prompts, click on that delightful image up above.

To add your contribution to the linky, simply click on the little froggy dude below:

This month’s prompt was an open-ended invitation to fill in the blank with…

love in the time of button

Being a lover of wordplay in most of its many forms, I have chosen to fill in the blank with one of my personal favourite things.  I give you….

Love in the Time of Palindromes

*rated MA 15+ for implied adult themes*

“Happy birthday darling!” Ava kissed Otto.  “Dinner, 7 o’clock, UFO Tofu with Hannah and Bob. And, tickets to….”

“Ah! Satan Sees Natasha at the Llama Mall!”

“And for desserts, I stressed: no lemon, no melon.”

“You’re a mega gem!”

“And when we’re alone…”

“Not a banana baton?!”

….

“Fancy skipping dinner?”

I came in at 50 words on the knocker this month thanks to some judicious editing.  I’ve noticed I seem to be a big fan of dialogue based narrative…perhaps next month I should challenge myself to write an Fi50 with no dialogue at all….or maybe not.  Speaking of next month, our prompt for the March challenge will be:

tiny beautiful button

So feast your eyes on the efforts of our little Fi50 community for February, share the challenge around if you know any aspiring (or utterly casual) writers of mini-narrative, and generally enjoy our combined efforts to advance the cause of anti-novel writing!

Until next time,

Bruce

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Bruce’s Lucky Dip: Dating for the Literary Minded…

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Today’s selection in the lucky dip comes to you courtesy of the search term “dating”.  Yes, that most anticipated and awkward of human interactions has thrown up some unexpected, yet intriguing, titles for those interested in the world of courting and mate-selection. Set your peepers to stun as you peruse the following relationship reads:

For those looking for a magical, otherworldly dating experience:

wood nymph centaurFor the malodorous or otherwise unsavoury cassanova:

undateable

In case you can’t read it, the subtitle says “311 things guys do that guarantee they won’t be dating or having sex”.  One wonders why they stopped at 311….

For the slightly suspicious, or for those concerned about their intended’s fascination with taunting small animals:

dating a sociopath

For those looking for God’s gift to women. Literally.

dating jesus

For those hoping that love will blossom organically, without the need for pesticides or growth hormones:

meeting your half orange

As is often the case with the lucky dip, this is but a small selection of the exciting possibilities availalbe to the romantically-minded reader.  Feel free to add your own contributions for our appreciation!
Until next time,

Bruce