Bruce’s Reading Round-Up: Three for A New Year

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For the second day of the new year, I present to you an overload of books.  Well, not an overload, but given that it’s only day two of 2017 and I have three books for you, less voracious readers than ourselves may consider it a bit excessive.  I have a YA contemporary set in Paris, a middle grade series continuation and a middle grade fantasy adventure about identity and chocolate.  So for the first time in 2017, let’s saddle up and ride on in!

Lisette’s Paris Notebook (Catherine Bateson)

*We received a copy of Lisette’s Paris Notebook from Allen & Unwin for review*

Two Sentence Synopsis:  

lisettes-paris-notebook

Lisette’s Paris Notebook by Catherine Bateson.  Published by Allen & Unwin, January 3rd, 2017.  RRP: $16.99

Lisette (Lise) is taking a gap year in Paris and staying with her mother’s friend, a clairvoyant. While in Paris she meets some interesting people through her imposed French language class.

Muster up the motivation because:

If you’re in the mood for a languid yet exotic holiday that evokes feelings of romance, European style and new experiences, but don’t have the money to afford such a holiday, Lisette’s Paris Notebook could be the next best thing.  Lise is young, ready for adventure and raring to stamp her own style on the world’s capital of haute couture and finds herself cramped in a tiny bedsit above a clairvoyant’s storefront.  While Paris doesn’t immediately turn out to be what she expected, Lise nevertheless commits to attending a French language class as a small concession to her mother’s dreams for her.  The class is filled with college-aged art students from around the world and Lise is both attracted to and intimidated by the easy style and sophistication of her classmates.  I will admit to DNFing this one about halfway through, at 144 pages – chapter 14 – not because the story was bad, but because I just don’t think I’m the intended audience for the book, not being a massive contemporary fan.   The only thing that had me cringing a bit was the fact that all the French characters that I encountered seemed to be weirdly stereotyped – abrupt to the point of rudeness, dismissive of other cultures or ways of doing things and set in their ideas about what one should do in France.  I’m not entirely sure what that was about, or whether it changes later on in the book, but I found it set my teeth on edge a bit.  Ardent fans of contemporary YA, and especially YA that borders on new adult and features coming-of-age issues and themes of identity should find lots to enjoy here.  The tone is light, there are some funny situations and generally this fits the bill as a relaxing, escapist holiday read.

Brand it with:

Enchante!; new adventures; fun with fashion

The Thornthwaite Betrayal (Gareth P. Jones)

*We received a copy of The Thornthwaite Betrayal from Allen & Unwin for review*

Two Sentence Synopsis:  

thornthwaite-betrayal

The Thornthwaite Betrayal by Gareth P. Jones.  Published by Allen & Unwin, January 3rd, 2017.  RRP: $16.99

Siblings who have previously enjoyed plotting each other’s demise have called a truce, when a long lost uncle turns up to make a claim on their ancestral home.  Mistrust ensues, as well as some new found interest in friendship with others, on the part of the twins.

Muster up the motivation because:

This is the second book following on from The Thornthwaite Inheritance, in which Ovid and Lorelli Thornthwaite enjoy attempting to kill each other – must be a twin thing – and their manor ends up being burnt down.  Unfortunately, I have not read the previous book, even though it’s been on my TBR list for quite some time, and it is this single factor that led to my putting down The Thornthwaite Betrayal after 44 pages. I’m generally a fan of Jones’ work – Constable and Toop and Death by Ice Cream being two of his back catalogue that I thoroughly enjoyed – but found this one hard to get into simply because I didn’t have the context of the previous book to draw on.  Some of the characters in this second book obviously made an appearance in the previous one, and some characters from the previous book are mentioned, but I really needed a bit more background information to get a picture of what exactly was going on and how the characters were linked.  Also, given that the thing that would draw me in most about these books is the idea of murderous twins, the fact that the twins weren’t being particularly murderous in the part of this I read meant that some of the expected shine was missing.  I will have to go back and read the first story before I can make proper comment on this one, I think.

Brand it with:

It’s a twin thing; long lost relatives; personal growth

The Dragon with a Chocolate Heart (Stephanie Burgis)

*We received a copy of The Dragon with a Chocolate Heart from Bloomsbury Publishing via Netgalley for review*

Two Sentence Synopsis:  dragon-with-a-chocolate-heart

A dragon ventures out of her cave to show her parents she can make it on her own and ends up inadvertently being turned into a human. She then does what any spell-cursed dragon would do: become an apprentice to a chocolatier.

Muster up the motivation because:

If you are looking for a fantasy tale that has an original premise and is guaranteed to appeal to any foodie fans in your life, this is the book for you!  The Dragon with a Chocolate Heart blends a dragon dynasty with a nasty spell, a class-based society and business competition to create a completely new storyline in middle grade fantasy reads.  Aventurine is a dragon who inadvertently falls under the spell of a food mage and is trapped in a human body.  After tasting chocolate for the first time, the determined girl (ex-dragon!) decides that if she must be trapped in a puny human body, the least she can do is apprentice herself to a chocolatier and learn the finer arts of creating her new favourite food.  The “dragon” part of the story takes a bit of a backseat during this time as Aventurine learns to navigate the human world and its unfamiliar trappings – two of which being human friendships and social interactions – until her family turns up wanting their darling dragon back and Aventurine’s temporary home is in the firing line.  While the story is undoubtedly fresh and original, my overall feeling while reading was that this is a strange sort of tale that can’t quite decide whether it should be a fish-out-of-water fantasy or a being-true-to-oneself friendship story.  While Aventurine is human, the very human experiences of friendship, betrayal, manipulation and position in society play a major role, and even if Aventurine herself never forgot her inner-dragonness, I certainly did at some points during the book, which meant that the story didn’t reach the heights of brilliance for me at any stage.  Nevertheless, I always welcome fresh takes on familiar tropes in middle grade fiction and Burgis has certainly delivered on that score.

Brand it with:

Feral foodies; master’s apprentices; fish out of water

Two days into the new year and three new books for you to hunt down: surely one of these titles takes your fancy?

Until next time,

Bruce

 

 

 

 

Level UP With Some Graphic Novel Goodness for Your Friday…

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Well, it’s Friday and I’m in love with Gene Luen Yang’s graphic “coming-of-age while being harassed by imaginary supernatural beings” memoir, Level Up.  We received our copy from PanMacmillan Australia for review and here’s the blurb from Goodreads:

Nothing is what it seems when life collides with video games.

Dennis Ouyang has always struggled in the shadow of his parents’ expectations: Stay focused in high school, do well in college, go to medical school, and become a gastroenterologist.

But between his father’s death, his academic burnout, and his deep (and distracting) love of video games, Dennis can’t endure. He’s kicked out of college. And that’s when things get . . . weird.

Four adorable—but bossy—angels, straight out of a sappy greeting card, appear and take charge of Dennis’s life. He’s back on track to become a gastroenterologist. But is he living the life he wants?

Partnered with the deceptively simple, cute art of Thien Pham, Gene Yang has returned to the subject he revolutionized withAmerican Born Chinese. Whimsical and serious by turns, Level Up is a new look at the tale that Yang has made his own: coming of age as an Asian American.

There’s nothing better, during a run of large, hefty novels, to kick back with a graphic memoir and revel in the brevity of the text.  Having said that, Level Up is probably best enjoyed in two or more sittings, just to allow the pain and indecision of “new adult” angst to sink in.  Dennis Ouyang is an all-round good egg it would seem, who is torn between fulfilling his parents’ wishes and chasing his video-game-glory-shaped dream.  For a fair bit of the book it feels like poor Dennis can’t do anything right, because whether he is achieving excellence in the field of pixellated reality or intestinal correction, he is plagued by guilt, or the ghost of his father, or general early-adult insecurities about the permanence of one’s initial course choices at university.

I particularly enjoyed how Dennis changes his mind multiple times throughout the book as different information, and family secrets, come to light.  It’s quite satisfying and reassuring to know that the choice that Dennis eventually makes is the right one for him, despite the fact that it evinced so much agonizing and drama in its attainment.

I feel the need to mention that Level Up is another addition to the “diversity” canon, as apart from the first-generation Chinese immigrant perspective, there are also Indian and Latino characters making up Dennis’s core group of friends.  The differences between Dennis’s life and family responsibilities are highlighted when Dennis’s Caucasian friend can’t understand why Dennis would pursue such a massive undertaking as medical school simply because it’s what his parents expect.

While I haven’t yet mentioned the ghostly, imaginary angels on the cover of the book, this is not because they do not play a major part in the story.  These four certainly sit at the creepier end of the angelic spectrum, and demonstrate an unshakable belief that Dennis’s true destiny lies in the field of gastroenterology.  To aid him in attaining his destiny, the tiny cherubs cook, clean, wash and generally sort out Dennis’s living arrangements to allow him to concentrate on study.  While this may sound like a boon for Dennis, the benefits go hand in hand with the demonic freak-outs to which the angels are prone when Dennis dares to defy their wishes.  The angels are an interesting plot device and we discover, in hilarious and unexpected fashion, the real purpose behind their existence toward the end of the novel.

Level Up was both a great brain-break in between much heftier reading responsibilities, and an endearing and authentic snapshot of early adulthood, with all its opportunities and uncertainties.  I’d definitely recommend it for when you need a quick reminder that you aren’t the only one wandering around wondering what on earth you are going to do with the rest of your life.

Until next time,

Bruce

 

 

Great Expectations…Slightly Dashed by Misleading Blurbs…

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GREAT (1)It’s time for another Great Expectations review, in which I compare my soaring expectations with the reality (good or not so good) of actually reading the book.  Today I have three new release YA novels whose blurbs led me to have reasonably high expectations but whose execution didn’t quite match up.  None of them were bad books per se (although I did decide not to finish one of them) but I felt like I had been sucked in to requesting them under false blurby  pretences.  Let’s get on with it shall we?

First up, here’s the DNFer: The Finding of Martha Lost by Caroline Wallace, which we received from the publisher via Netgalley.  Here’s the blurb from Goodreads:

Martha is lost.

She’s been lost since she was a baby, abandoned in a suitcase on the train from Paris. Ever since, she’s waited in station lost property for someone to claim her. It’s been sixteen years, but she’s still hopeful.

In the meantime, there are mysteries to solve: secret tunnels under the station, a suitcase that may have belonged to the Beatles, the roman soldier who appears at the same time every day with his packed lunch. Not to mention the stuffed monkey that someone keeps misplacing.

But there is one mystery Martha cannot solve. And now the authorities have found out about the girl in lost property. Time is running out – if Martha can’t discover who she really is, she will lose everything…

the finding of martha lost

What I Expected:

An absolutely crackingly quirky novel that combined all the excitement and urban mythology of train stations with all the mystery and intrigue of lost things all wrapped up in a cast of humorous, memorable characters.  Essentially, I was expecting a sort of cross between The Graveyard Book and a Peter Grant-esque tale of fascinating hidden worlds but without all the murders, ghosts and crazy magical stuff.  The cover is a bit of a tease in that direction too – that person fishing for sneakers is at least as tantalising and whimsical as anything promised in the blurb.

What I Got:

Now given that I DNFed this one at 21%, it may seem a bit presumptuous to start complaining that I didn’t come across certain things I was expecting, but the first fifth of this book was just not quirky enough to hold my interest.  I would have hoped that there would have been a bit of a secret tunnel or roman soldier within that 21% to whet my appetite, but no.  Just a remarkably ordinary (and annoyingly naïve) young girl and her friend who runs a café within the station.  I did find the whole “I can’t leave the station or it will collapse” concept a tad over the top for a sixteen year old protagonist even if she was subjected to some less-than-stellar adoptive parenting.  Overall, I wanted a touch of the ol’ magical realism, as seems to be promised in the blurb, but there was not a skerrick of it in the fifth that I read.  And as for a mention of the eternal stuffed monkey? Not a sausage.


 

The next two books were kindly sent to us for review from Simon & Schuster Australia.  Let’s start with Thanks for the Trouble by Tommy Wallach.  Here’s the blurb from Goodreads:

“I’ve got some questions for you. Was this story written about me?”

I shrugged.

“Yes or no?”

I shrugged again, finally earning a little scowl, which somehow made the girl even more pretty. It brought a bloom to her pale cheeks and made sharp shelves of her cheekbones.

“It’s very rude not to answer simple questions,” she said.

I gestured for my journal, but she still wouldn’t give it to me. So I took out my pen and wrote I can’t on my palm.

Then, in tiny letters below it, I finished the thought: Now don’t you feel like a jerk?

Parker Santé hasn’t spoken a word in five years. While his classmates plan for bright futures, he skips school to hang out in hotels, killing time by watching the guests. But when he meets a silver-haired girl named Zelda Toth, a girl who claims to be quite a bit older than she looks, he’ll discover there just might be a few things left worth living for.

thanks for the trouble

What I Expected:

In one hyphenated word, I expected time-travel.  The female protagonist claims to be at least 100 years old and I was hoping that there was going to be some snazzy time travel or at least time bending going on in the novel.  I won’t tell you what there is specifically, because that would be a spoiler, but be assured there is no time travel.  Not a sausage.

What I Got:

Once again, I am in the minority of opinion on this book if Goodreads is anything to go by, because over 176 ratings, this book has an average of 4.05 stars and I gave it two stars, which equates to “It was okay.”  It’s my own fault for reading things into the blurb that aren’t really there but this book turned out to be penned in that particular style of magical realism that I find especially irritating.  The kind that hints at something but in fact turns out to be something else that may or may not be perfectly ordinary and mundane.  I’ll have to stop hinting there myself, because I don’t want to give anything away.  I found that the story started off with an engaging setting: we meet Parker as he is deciding whether or not to steal a wad of cash from a beautiful lady in a hotel restaurant.  I will admit that I quite enjoyed the first third or so of the book and then I began to lose interest due to the slow slide into events such as young person banter and parties and various other bits that may well appeal to younger readers than I, but generally make my stony eyelids droop.

One thing that really confused me was the fact that early on, Parker is specifically described as a Latino male, of the sort that wouldn’t be welcome (or would be looked at sideways) if seated in the restaurant of a fancy hotel.  Why then, if Parker’s Latino heritage is so emphasised, did the designers choose a rather gormless looking white boy for the cover?   If you’re going to make a big thing about his ethnicity, being that diversity in protagonists is such a popular thing nowadays, why not make the person on the cover look less like a white guy and more like the minority he’s meant to be representing?  It boggles the mind.

The ending was more ambiguous than I expected and did redeem the book a little for me.  I was quite surprised that the author would go where he did with such a controversial topic, but go there he did and I think the book is the better for it.  Overall though, this was just an “okay” read that I wish had relied a bit more on the magical side of magical realism and taken things to a stranger, more mind-twisting level.


 

Finally we have a new adult murder mystery, All These Perfect Strangers by acclaimed Australian crime writer Aoife Clifford.  Here’s the blurb from Goodreads:

‘This is about three deaths. Actually more, if you go back far enough. I say deaths, but perhaps all of them were murders. It’s a grey area. Murder, like beauty, is in the eye of the beholder. So let’s just call them deaths and say I was involved. This story could be told a hundred different ways.’

You don’t have to believe in ghosts for the dead to haunt you.

You don’t have to be a murderer to be guilty.

Within six months of Pen Sheppard starting university, three of her new friends are dead. Only Pen knows the reason why.

College life had seemed like a wonderland of sex, drugs and maybe even love. The perfect place to run away from your past and reinvent yourself. But Pen never can run far enough and when friendships are betrayed, her secrets are revealed. The consequences are deadly.

all these perfect strangers
What I Expected:
Suspense.  Mystery.  Mind-f*ckery.  A story that would have me puzzling and strategizing and trying to outwit the author in an epic tussle between one of the brightest lights in Australian crime fiction and the cleverest gargoyle getting about the shelf.

What I Got:

Long, drawn out descriptions of life as a first year in a university college (or dorm as our North American friends might refer to them).  It’s been a good long while since I sat on the shelf of a first-year undergraduate, but it appears that life is just as self-indulgent, narcissistic and populated with complete tools, for contemporary undergrads as it was for undergrads of the past.  The great emphasis on murder in the blurb of this book might lead one to believe that there would be a lot of murder-mystery type content going on in the story, but murder, while hinted at vaguely in Pen’s sessions with her psychotherapist, doesn’t really play a big part in the first third of the story.

When it does finally happen (in the present, rather than Pen’s past), the suspense doesn’t crank up even one tiny notch.  And as mysterious deaths keep happening, the suspense level remains at exactly the level at which it started – low.  I really couldn’t say for sure why I didn’t feel any suspense or need to puzzle things out while I was reading but I suspect it has something to do with the lack of information given at the beginning of the story.  We know that something happened involving Pen before she got to university, but it is touched upon so vaguely and with such round-about discussion, that I couldn’t really picture Pen as someone with a haunted past or the potential to be dangerous, because it was as if she had already put it behind her.  Similarly, many of here college-mates were so annoying or ineffectual that I was quite pleased when they met their respective ends.

I really wanted to love this and engage with it on an intellectual, can-I-outwit-the-author sort of a level, but there was just too much tedious, new adult, boring relationship melodrama and not enough devious plotting or red-herring-osity going down.  Shame really.

I am very interested in checking out some of Clifford’s other work now however, to see if this is just an errant blip for an otherwise kick-ass crime writer.  I suspect it might be the case.


So what do you think?  Have I been mislead in my expectations from reading these blurbs or have I read something into them that was never there?

Until next time,

Bruce

A YA Read-it-if Review: Cooper Bartholomew is Dead…

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It’s back to some YA (well, closer to NA actually), teen drama goodness for today’s Read-it-if Review, with the cheerily titled Cooper Bartholomew is Dead by Rebecca James (Australian! Woot!).  I was kindly provided a copy of this intriguing tale of mystery and romance by Allen and Unwin in exchange for review.

The body of Cooper Bartholomew is found at the base of a cliff and all who knew him are shocked and devastated at Cooper’s tragic end, presumed to be suicide.  But what could possibly have caused good looking, charismatic, newly-in-love Cooper to end his life in such a way?  Told from multiple points of view and jumping between the weeks before Cooper’s death and the weeks after, the story of Cooper, his new girlfriend Libby, and old friends Claire and Sebastian unfolds to reveal some long-held secrets that might shed light on why Cooper died…and whether anything could have been done to prevent it.

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Read it if:

*you like a mystery that slowly unravels, leaving suspicion, doubts and a little bit of tangled yarn at the end

* you like your YA characters to be believable, rather than two-dimensional or stereotypical (or both)

*you’ve been waiting and waiting for a YA novel to feature the fates and fortunes of the post-high-school set in small town Australia

Straight off the bat, let me say how impressed I was with the overall experience of reading this book.  The plot is tight, the narrative style is interesting and well constructed and the characters – oh the characters! – are so believable it’s almost painful.  James has done an incredible job, in my opinion, of creating characters that represent pitch perfectly the range of vices and virtues that appear in all of us once school is over and done and we have to figure out who we’re going to be in this strange real world.  This was the greatest strength of the story for me and ultimately what kept me interested through the mushy romance bits between Cooper and Libby.  Well done Rebecca James *insert sound of stone paws clapping heartily here*

Another great bit about this reading experience is the narrative style that features multiple points of view and multiple timeframes.  Regular readers of this blog should know that I just love this writing style and once again it drew me into the story with short, engaging chapters introducing the characters and their relationships in a highly readable way.  In fact, the book opens with Cooper in his final moments pre-death and his surprisingly lucid musings are a great launching point to plunge (sorry, horrid pun in the circumstances) right into the tangled web of secrecy that has led to this point.

Regarding the plot and the elements of mystery surrounding Cooper’s seemingly happy life and strange and unexpected death, clues are thrown out fairly early for the keen-eyed reader but the whole situation is not revealed until the final few chapters, keeping the suspense high throughout.  I admit that I did have my suspicions about halfway through the book, and these turned out to be kinda right and kinda wrong, so in the end I was satisfied with both my level of sleuthery and the author’s level of tricksiness.

This book is going to appeal to a whole range of YA/NA fans – fans of standard contemporary romance, fans of mystery, fans of friendship dramas – and even if you aren’t a big YA fan, the writing and characterisation is strong enough to draw you in anyway, despite the age of the cast.  I expected that I would be fairly interested in this book, but it has far exceeded my expectations and I will certainly be keeping an eye out for James’ other work from now on.

Cooper Bartholomew is Dead is released in October.

Until next time,

Bruce

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ARC Read it if Review: Grim…

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imageAfternoon all, and welcome to the first in my series of reviews of Fairy Tale retellings.  You may (or may not) recall that I was previously a reject-out-of-hand type of gargoyle regarding any kind of fairy tale reimagining, given that I was not that great a fan of fairy tales to begin with.  At the end of last year however, I read two fairy tale reimaginings – Scar and the Wolf by Plainfield Press and Talespins by Michael Mullins – and enjoyed them so much that I was forced to review my (admittedly fairly judgemental) policy.  So this year one of my goals is to delve more deeply into this genre and see what comes of it.

To kick us off, I present to you Grim, edited by Christine Johnson. I received a digital copy of this book from the publisher via Netgalley in return for an honest review – thanks!  Grim is an anthology of stories based on classic fairy tales, but with a dark or sinister twist, reimagined by a collection of prominent and current authors in Young Adult fiction.   There are a whopping seventeen stories to whet your appetite over the whole 480ish pages, so surely there must be something here for everyone.  The stories range from the light and humorous (oddly, for a book of supposedly dark and sinister retellings) to the …well…dark and sinister.  And be warned, some of these are very dark and quite remarkably sinister.  But more of that later.

GrimRead it if:

*you enjoy fairy tales the way they were traditionally meant to be enjoyed – that is, with a healthy dose of blood, gore and summary justice to make your stomach turn

* you’re a fan of YA fiction boys – book boyfriends, bookish beaus, reader’s eyecandy, whatever you want to call them – and the whole paranormal romance genre in general…preferably with a side order of blood, gore and summary justice to make your stomach turn

* you enjoy the idea of fairy tales but, like me, you can never quite remember how the original ones turned out in the end anyway

So I’ll start with the positives.  The thing I like about anthologies is that the diversity of authors writing about the same topic generally means that there will be at least a few (although, with a bit of luck, many) stories in the bunch that really hit the nail on the head for you.  This was the case for me with Grim.  Out of the seventeen stories, there were a handful that I really enjoyed, with The Brothers Pigget, Thinner Than Water, Better, and Figment being the main ones that I still remember clearly after finishing the book at least a week ago.  There were others that I enjoyed reading, but didn’t make a marked impression, such as The Key, Raven Princess and Light It Up, and the rest I could either take or leave, or I really hated.  But that’s the good thing about anthologies – I didn’t expect to love every story, and I was pleasantly surprised that I enjoyed the majority that appeared here.

A lot of the tales really do take a whole new spin on the stories they are retelling, which is always good.  There was a wide range of settings – space ships and a rock and roll tour being two of the most obscure – and this really added to the experience for me as, with the sheer number of stories here, the book could be in danger of going stale with too much repetition.

On the other hand, there were a few things that struck me as odd about this collection.  For one thing, I found it really tricky in some cases to figure out which fairy tale was being re-told.  Now, admittedly, I am not an expert on fairy tales so it could have just been my deficiency in this particular field of knowledge causing the problem, but in case others also had this problem, I imagine it would be fairly irritating to those who really know their fairy tales.  It didn’t bother me too much – I just enjoyed the stories at face value rather than trying to decipher their origin – but if I had bought this book as a lover of fairy tales, I think some of these stories would have fallen short for me.

Similarly, the book is touted as a collection of retellings “with a dark and sinister twist”.  A handful of these stories, as I mentioned earlier, don’t seem to have a twist at all, and others are not dark in the least.  For instance, my favourite of the bunch, Figment, was really quite funny and had a really likeable narrator.  (Don’t ask me to tell you which tale it was based on, I’ve got no idea).  Another one, Light it Up, simply modernised the Hansel and Gretel story, rather than giving it any new twist.  Again, this didn’t bother me particularly – in fact the two I’ve just mentioned were two that I really enjoyed – but it seems a bit strange that the collection would include these stories when the premise of the book is the “dark and sinister” bit.

But now to the major beef I had with this book. I acknowledge that others will not share this one, especially given the point that this was billed as a “dark and sinister” book – but I had real issues with the themes of sexual violence in some of the stories.  In a couple of the stories (by no means all, so don’t get the wrong impression), there were instances of incest, implied rape and general brutality, all perpetrated against female characters.  Now, I don’t have a problem with that necessarily, provided two conditions are met – one, that there is some kind of warning in the blurb (and I don’t mean like a parental guidance warning, I just mean something that hints that this is really for the upper end of the YA market, if not New Adult) and two, that the instances of sexual violence are in some way integral to the plot.  In one of the stories, at least condition two was met.  In Thinner than Water, we get the whole shebang – incest, graphic violence and animal cruelty – but those elements are essential to the plot and outcome of the story.  I can’t say I enjoyed reading this one, but I certainly appreciated the way the elements were worked into the story in order to create the story arc and resolution.  In fact, in terms of crafting the story, I think this one was the best of the bunch.

The other two instances, in Better (implied rape) and Skin Trade (brutal violence toward a female character) were, in my view, completely gratuitous.  More so for the latter story than the former, but still gratuitous.  This particularly annoyed me for Skin Trade, because again, I couldn’t figure out which fairy tale this was based on, and also because the predatory behaviour of the males in the story and the ultimate violent violation of the female character just seemed far out of place for a book marketed at young adults.  Call me old-fashioned but I don’t see why a story in which

***spoiler alert here***

a young woman is hunted by three men, only to be restrained naked in their basement before having her skin torn off

***end spoiler alert***

really needs to be included in an anthology that will be read by people in their early teens.  In fact, thinking of that story still gives me the creeps, but not in a satisfying, “man that was a great, scary twist!” kind of way.  More in a “man, that was completely gross and uncalled for” sort of way.

So really, I had a mixed experience with this one, but apart from that one story that crossed a line for me, overall, the experience was good.  I’d say, if you are a fan of fairy tale retellings, definitely give this one a go.

Grim is due for release on February 25th 2014.

Until next time,

Bruce

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